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So I have my t-shirts all designed, and my money saved. I have chosen a screen printer, and I have also bought my own t-shirts. I would like to go to some local shops around where I live, and wholesale my shirts and see if they will buy them. How many shirts should I expect to sell to them? And what should my pricing be?

i.e. I take my example's to a local skateshop, and they order 20 t-shirts, for $5.00 each?

Should I expect them to order more?
Should I raise my prices?
 

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screen printer aint gone sell your shirts for you homie, thats not what they do, you need to find a retailer. if your designs are gangster print em on really big shirts and find a gas station near a rough area of town that is ran by middle easterners, these guys can be a life line for you. seriously you gotta find a retailer, or directly seek out your customers yourself
 

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i'm sorry i did misunderstand i thought when you said local shops you meant screen printing shops, of course that wouldn't make sense because you would only need one screen printingshop to print them for you anyway. that was just me being foolish. i would like to target those gas stations as an effective retail outlet though
 

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How many shirts should I expect to sell to them?
Depends on the size of the retail store. The bigger the store, the more you should expect them to order. But if you are a new brand, then you should expect a modest order to start out. For a smaller store, maybe a few dozen shirts at most.

And what should my pricing be?
Pricing should be based on your production costs. A typical scale is to double your cost to get the wholesale price. The retailer will then double the wholesale price to get the retail price. Just make sure that retail price is consistent with the value of your brand and other brands the store may carry. If not, you may need to make some adjustments in your pricing.
 

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We haven't launched yet, still working out the business plan and marketing strategies; however, our pricing model is based very similar to what Tim (Kimura_MMA) mentioned above. We plan on adjusting our prices as any of our costs change, but I think this is a pretty good rule of thumb. Therefore, $5.00 is probably a pretty good price if you are producing for $2.50 and expect the retailer to sell for about $10.00.
 

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Remember that the printer, you and the retailer has to make a profit. Rule of thumb is double. You double what it costs you and sell it to the retailer for that. He in turn doubles it and sells it. I just sold shirts to a shop on consignment. I charged 10 and she sold for 20. I figured it cost me less than 5 so everyone makes out. Let them tell you what they need in sizes. They know their customers.
 
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