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I am an artist. I paint all original works of art on canvas and if I think that they will look good on a t-shirt, I do so and sell them online. I've made a few sales online but more so at shows and in niche markets. Very well in niche markets.... I am looking for feedback on my shirts. They can be viewed at tshirts. I have my own style of images and a logo/brand that goes with all my shirts. I'm looking for hard unbiased feedback from strangers. Thanks!
 

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those are some cool designs... the only thing i would do is try to make the edges blend into the shirt so it's not a square... either feather out the edge or use a pshop brush and give the design a kind of ragged edge... and possibly use a distress mask so the shirt design looks worn... good luck with your sales... i'm betting you will do fine...
 

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Thanks. I was hoping for others feedback but maybe that will come in time. I know what you mean about the blending issue. I am working on that. The actual shirts do not look so blocky like they do online. I should have other designs online shortly. I am waiting on permission to sell designs of businesses that already carry designs that I've created for them specifically. I'm not sure how that will work. I'm guessing that I will have to pay them a percentage of each shirt.

I am an artist. I paint all original works of art on canvas and if I think that they will look good on a t-shirt, I do so and sell them online. I've made a few sales online but more so at shows and in niche markets. Very well in niche markets.... I am looking for feedback on my shirts. They can be viewed at tshirts. I have my own style of images and a logo/brand that goes with all my shirts. I'm looking for hard unbiased feedback from strangers. Thanks!
 

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I was hoping for others feedback but maybe that will come in time.
I don't know why other people might not have given you feedback, but I'll tell you why I didn't in case that does help afterall.

As far as the artwork goes, well, I hate pointillism so I don't like it at all. Put it on a t-shirt and I think it's even worse: whatever few positive characteristics it might have had hanging on a gallery wall are lost as a t-shirt.

That's a matter of opinion though, and I thought it would be churlish of me to say anything. When artwork is just bad in every way (it happens) I'm more likely to just be honest and criticise it - but when artwork clearly took skill to produce (like in this case), subjectivity comes in and I may just stay quiet. I don't like it, but I wouldn't be expected to like it, and others might.

So I have no idea if this represents only my feelings or others too, but from my point of view... pointillism and t-shirts are simply not a winning combination. For that matter painting and t-shirts are rarely a winning combination - throw Raphael on a t-shirt and I'll probably start wondering what I ever saw in him. T-shirts aren't just a blank billboard (or canvas), they're their own medium - so what works for one won't necessarily work for the other. T-shirts are a printmakers medium, and as such I think they lend themselves better to those styles.

So I don't know that that's particularly helpful, but maybe these designs just aren't moving people to respond.
 

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I don't know why other people might not have given you feedback, but I'll tell you why I didn't in case that does help afterall.
I do thank you for your candid feedback. I also respect your opinion but your message does warrent a response on my part.

As far as the artwork goes, well, I hate pointillism so I don't like it at all. Put it on a t-shirt and I think it's even worse: whatever few positive characteristics it might have had hanging on a gallery wall are lost as a t-shirt. So I have no idea if this represents only my feelings or others too, but from my point of view... pointillism and t-shirts are simply not a winning combination. For that matter painting and t-shirts are rarely a winning combination - throw Raphael on a t-shirt and I'll probably start wondering what I ever saw in him.
From this artist, I'd like to say that there is nothing sacred about art. It's very much like a t-shirt. Subject to the market and always for sale.

Few know what pointillism is and it really doesn't matter. For those who do spend on art, there are more that spend on t-shirts. People who do like my work, tend to love the t-shirts.

I've seen art on t-shirts countless times. Andy Warhol had a team of people working for him who slapped his work on everything and it sold very well. This helped increase the value of his original art. Jerry Garcia of the Greatful Dead made big bucks off a tie die shirts. He had two huge talents that feed eachother. I've never seen Raphael on a shirt but I have seen famous works like, "Mona Lisa" and "American Gothic" on shirts, mugs and other maketing items.

T-shirts aren't just a blank billboard (or canvas), they're their own medium - so what works for one won't necessarily work for the other.
T-shirts and canvases both start out blank and are endless in possiblities. T-shirts are a billboard and when you wear a nike t-shirt..... you are putting a billboard on your chest.

T-shirts are a printmakers medium, and as such I think they lend themselves better to those styles.
Medium is choice in which you choose to express yourself. How can you say that this should somehow be limited to "those styles"?
 

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The designs themselves would look good when viewed from far away but the nature of pointillism would tend to make them look worse viewed close up. I respect the time it must take to design the pieces of art shown though. .....JB
 

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These kind of shirts aren't really my thing (I also don't like to see a painting on a shirt), but I think they would do well in some markets. For example, gift shops at museums or other tourist attractions, regional festivals, etc. I don't think they will do well selling over the internet, for something like this you really need to see it in person.

I would think about making a small portfolio/catalog of good quality photos of your designs and sending them to tourist attractions and chambers of commerce for various cities around the country. You can offer to make custom designs for their tourist attraction/city/festival, etc. or offer an all-in-one package (custom design and shirts).
 

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I've seen art on t-shirts countless times.
Art makes for great t-shirts - just not (in my opinion) most paintings.

Andy Warhol had a team of people working for him who slapped his work on everything and it sold very well.
You mean Andy Warhol the screenprinting printmaker? ;) Not much of a stretch to apply that to a t-shirt.

I've never seen Raphael on a shirt but I have seen famous works like, "Mona Lisa" and "American Gothic" on shirts, mugs and other maketing items.
Yeah, it does simply depend on finding an audience. Personally I hate that kind of stuff. There's no market for it in indie fashion (what I'm interested in), and there's no market for it in mainstream fashion (what I'm at least tangentially interested in). However there's clearly some large niche markets that would be interested (tourists, older people, etc.). I think slapping something from the Guggenheim on a t-shirt and selling it in the gift shop fails as a t-shirt, but that doesn't mean it will fail as commerce.

T-shirts and canvases both start out blank and are endless in possiblities. T-shirts are a billboard and when you wear a nike t-shirt..... you are putting a billboard on your chest.
T-shirts are a billboard in the sense that they're mobile advertising. But I think people make the mistake of thinking that therefore they're a billboard in the sense that they're a big blank rectangle you can slap whatever you want on. Billboards are designed to have flat graphics printed on them edge to edge - the human body isn't.

Technically just about anything you can put on a piece of paper can be put on a canvas and vice versa, and some artists go out of their way to prove that point. On the other hand, most artists make aesthetic choices that limit those endless possibilities before they ever begin. Some techniques just don't work as well on canvas as they do on paper (or vice versa), or aren't even always physically possible. The same artist would take a different approach depending on whether they were using ink on paper or paint on canvas. The t-shirt is something different again.

Those choices are the difference between what simply can be done, and what is actually well received.

Medium is choice in which you choose to express yourself. How can you say that this should somehow be limited to "those styles"?
Because when you choose a medium you also choose how you are going to express yourself. Method and medium are linked.
 
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