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im getting ready to screen print coroplast signs.
I've read where you should use a valcum pallet.
But I also read where you can use some kind of glue to hold the sign down to the pallet. Could you share the info.
thanks
dk
 

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im getting ready to screen print coroplast signs.
I've read where you should use a valcum pallet.
But I also read where you can use some kind of glue to hold the sign down to the pallet. Could you share the info.
thanks
dk
if its only one color you dont need anything to hold them down.

use a 230 mesh
 

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if its only one color you dont need anything to hold them down.

use a 230 mesh
It depends:

1. How big your sign is. The smaller and less weight, the more chance it can lift up.

2. How heavy your graphics are. If they are real heavy bold areas, it could cause it to stick.

3. How thick your ink is. Just be sure to thin down the ink enough so where it flows well. Not too thin where it's not a solid print, but not too thick where it can clog your screen.

4. What mesh count you use. 230 is the minimum you most likely should use when printing with conventional inks. The inks are thinner than plastisol, so the lower the mesh, the more ink pushes through the screen. This will definitely cause the sign to stick to the screen, but it will also cause a mess.

5. How fast you work. If you work slow, you will get clogging, but your ink will thicken quickly. You have to keep the ink moving at a pace of 4 to 5 prints per minute. It will still thicken but if you have a spray bottle with thinner in it, you can mist the surface of the ink in the flooded stage and it will loosen your ink up again. You just don't want it to thicken because it will cause problems.

These factors can help stop the need for a vacuum table, but again, if your sign is too small (18x24 should be fine), it will be too light.

Also, you will want to print with the flute, not against it. This will make sure you get the ink down into the recessed areas instead of having white lines throughout.
 

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I use transfer tape! Sticky side up taped around the edges to the platen with plain old masking tape. I think it is the same idea as platen tape for t-shirts.
 

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I agree with everthing Jerid says, with the exception of printing with the flutes. Conventional wisdom would seem to be that that would be the easiest way to do it, but, it's also much easier to control a shorter squeegie over a longer distance than a longer one over a short distance. I started out with the longer squeegie. Cut it down, built a vacuum table, and print against the flutes. The trick is to turn your squeegie slightly so that it isn't perpendicular to the flutes, even as the direction of the pull is perpendicular to the flutes. It eliminates the "chattering" of the squeegie across the high spots of the flutes. It is something I also do anyway on t-shirts, and especially on designs where there is a distinct open area in the stencil that would be parallel to the direction of the squeegie pull. It's not unusual for the squeegie to "snag" on a long open parallel edge of the stencil, and cocking the squeegie slightly, but pulling or pushing straight eliminates the snag.
 

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Thanks, Contract Printer. We successfully work out of our two car attached garage and have printed endless thousands of hats and tshirts out of there with plastisol and no smells.
I just wonder if there is a non toxic or non smelly ink to print on a fibre board that is an eighth inch thick. My suppliers tell me there is not.
just still lookin
 

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Thanks, Contract Printer. We successfully work out of our two car attached garage and have printed endless thousands of hats and tshirts out of there with plastisol and no smells.
I just wonder if there is a non toxic or non smelly ink to print on a fibre board that is an eighth inch thick. My suppliers tell me there is not.
just still lookin
open the doors and blow a fan outside. you probably wont want to do it all the time. but every once in a while is not bad. i turn those jobs down.
 

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If you're printing on a paper-based or wood-based material, you can use just about any paint that's made to stick to those substrates. A lot of garage-based poster printers use common latex paints from Home Depot. I guess it all depends on what your "fiber board" is made of.
 

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The trick is to turn your squeegie slightly so that it isn't perpendicular to the flutes, even as the direction of the pull is perpendicular to the flutes.
Good tip, this would help for sure. Sometimes the simplest solutions are overlooked.
 
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