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Also, if you are going to remove the size label, don't forget that most of the information that is legally required to be on a permanent label (i.e. country of origin, RN or full business name, care instructions, etc.) is on that tag. A screenprinted tag does meet the legal requirements for labelling (it just needs to be permanent and prominent), but if you remove the size tag you will need to transfer a lot of that information across. So there's only so clean that design can look if you want it to stay legal (Threadless are a good example of this, as their labels have had to change as they realised they weren't compliant, and last I looked they still weren't actually up to spec).
 

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Comin'OutSwingin said:
This situation is different for me. I haven't sold one shirt online yet, but have sold plenty face-to-face. And before I started getting my own labels sewn in, it was hard to convince some people to take me or my product seriously. They would look at the label and know that I don't own proclub! But once I got my labels sewn in, it was never an issue again. No one has ever asked me if it is a relabel of another shirt, mostly because the regular buying public doesn't know anything about relabeling. So when they see my label, with my company's name on it, they assume it's my shirt, and more legitimate than the next guy with the FOL label in it.

But again, I'm in a different market than most on the forums.
Concur that it depends on your market. I've been thinking about this for the market that I'm going after... My two prime competitors are well known throughout my target demographic and both have their own labels... I really want labels in my shirts, but have decided against it until I break even.

So I guess I'm about to find out if labels really matter within my target market. ;)
 

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This is an old thread, but I was reading through it and it sounds like what we do to an extent. We screen print the information from both tags we clip on our label by turning the shirts inside out. We have all the sizes on one screen, and a piece of tape keeps the ones we don't want to print from showing up. It was really a nice, workable solution for us, and would seem to be for anyone doing their own screen work. Not sure what it would cost to get someone to do it for you though.
 

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I know alstyle has a tear away label and I know a great local place in Miami that does iron on labels. I also have a few seamstresses that work for me that will do a complete under the collar label change for about .25 a shirt. For more info feel free to private message or email me I'd be more than happy to help.
 

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As far as the end, paying customer goes, I don't think they could care one bit about a t-shirt having a custom neck label. It's just not a selling point. Especially online when a customer will never see or know about the neck label when they are buying the t-shirt.
Actually, it is a major selling point, depending on the customer. Even on-line customers who can't see it in the ad will see it when they receive it and when they tell their friends to (or not to) purchase from you. If you are a brand, then people appreciate the extra details and will pay more for your products at retail locations. We have a print shop as well as a retail outlet in a local mall where we offer our brand to the public. We have found that those details make allot of difference in peoples' perceived value.

We remove the manufacturers labels in our shop and replace them with a screen-printed label inside the neckline, done in a color that contrasts the fabric color. The label is printed using plastisol ink through a 156 screen, and the type is perfectly legible - easier to read than the original sewn-in label. The info on the printed label includes the brand info, logo and website, material spec, washing instructions, and "Made in USA", which works since we only use garments originally made in USA. If you're using Gildan, you can't legally put "Made in USA" - you could put "Printed in USA", and should still put "Made in Honduras" or wherever that particular run came from.
 

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I'm still debating on how I'm going to label.
I'm going to screen print the shirts, but wasn't sure if I should screen print a label or get custom labels sewn in. Then, I realized I have what I thought was a worthless to me hat heat transfer machine. But I bet I could use it to heat transfer labels on.
I'll do what is cheapest. I'm not to that stage, yet, though.
 

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Then, I realized I have what I thought was a worthless to me hat heat transfer machine. But I bet I could use it to heat transfer labels on.
Yep, the cap press is great for putting on heat transfer labels. That's what was used to relabel some of the forum t-shirts.
 

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we've pretty much brainstormed all the possibilities that were mentioned before ... but i wanted to know people's opinions with fabric ink stamps.... for relabelling... we were seriously thinking of cutting out both the brand and info tags from the shirts then using a rubber stamp (with all necessary info) and a fabric paint like ZIMPAINT, or a stencil and a foam brush with ZIMPAINT.

Zim's Fabric Paint - Sale!: Zimprints

i have not tested it out yet... but it claims you cant feel it on the fabric so it wont bother or itch your back neckline...

does anyone have any advice on INDELLIGIBLE stamps, and/or permanent fabric ink stamps? ...

i'm not worried that if after a year of washing it fades away... i kinda like that idea...
 

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75 cents! the company I use charges 25 cents to take out the old label and sew in the new one on the neck tape. It's just 35 cents if it is to go under the neck tape. With no minimums! 75 cents is definitely the highest I've heard!

I also would think that it would more to have info screen printed if you are outsourcing it, unless you had some large quantities. When I was asking around at different printers, they said that they treat the price just like printing in another location. So if you have a one color screen print in the neck, it would be the same as whatever your printer charged for a 1 color print for however many shirts you were having printed up. Unless you have a large volume, that's going to be around a dollar per print.

Having woven labels made and sewn in is much cheaper, even for the most expensive of woven labels (damask).

You can get 1,000 woven polyester labels for around .15/label, and sewn in for as little as .25/label. Much cheaper than having someone print your stuff in the shirt. And like Rodney said, if you are going for a "clean" look, then most likely the old label still needs to be taken out by somebody.

As for higher quality issue, I've got a different opinion. I really think this is more market driven. I've seen people with urban wear designs print on a jerzees, hanes, etc. good looking stuff, but have people laugh at it and say "man, all he did was go get some regular shirts and print on it. this stuff ain't real!". I've seen this so many times. So maybe it's not a quality issue, but more of a ligitimacy issue. If there are people in your market that think this way, you may sell to them online because they can't see if you have a tag, but they will be the ones that won't be repeat customers, because of their view of you and your product. Real or not.

This situation is different for me. I haven't sold one shirt online yet, but have sold plenty face-to-face. And before I started getting my own labels sewn in, it was hard to convince some people to take me or my product seriously. They would look at the label and know that I don't own proclub! But once I got my labels sewn in, it was never an issue again. No one has ever asked me if it is a relabel of another shirt, mostly because the regular buying public doesn't know anything about relabeling. So when they see my label, with my company's name on it, they assume it's my shirt, and more legitimate than the next guy with the FOL label in it.

But again, I'm in a different market than most on the forums.
i was wondering what company do use to print your shirts and where can you get polyester tags made for you to be sewn in im new and im trying to get as much information as i can think you can help please
 

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Ive started printing my own labels just to advertise my company. I do a lot of shirts for bands & figured It'd be good advertising to have my logo & details on the neck.

I dont turn the shirts inside out. Ive come up with a much faster way. Just cut a piece off an old platen a little bigger than your label. In my case its 5" x 2.5". I then removed a platen from one of my stations & in its place attached this small piece of platen. Now you can print the neck labels without turing your shirts inside out. Ive posted pics to give you a better idea of what Im on about. This is such a time saver.



For the screen I just put all the different size labels on the one screen all in a row. Ive got side clamps so once Ive one label set up the rest are all in line also. So when I need to change size I just slide the screen up or down, press down a bit so the mini platen underneath sticks in to the screen & tighten the side clamps when in position again. I tape the labels that arent in use to keep the shirt underneath clean.

The only problem Ive had so far is when I use black ink on light shirts, It almost bleeds out to the other side so for this reason I use gold ink. I would love to use black on the light shirts as it looks much better. Any tips on how I could achieve this? Thin the ink with extender base? (im using plastisol) 305 mesh? Harder durometer squeegee?

Thanks,
Tom.
 

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You've just given me an idea. If your platen riser is high enough, maybe twice the height as the one you have now, I might get away with not having to tape the other sizes not being screened.

What do you think?

Regarding white shirts, even using a thicker shirt will not prevent black from showing through. I do like you do and use a lighter (gray) ink. This way you can use the same color ink on both light and darks.
 

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We do this for a number of our customers and it poses some interesting problems. First is sizing, you will need a screen for each size you will be running. Second, remember it is illegal to sell clothing without a manufacturing origin. Obviously if you are doing small boutique runs that is not too important but any licensed product or large runs should have this in the label.

As for production it's simple for screen printing, simply flip the shirt inside out and print it just as if you were printing a chest logo only a bit higher. We have not run into any platen issues that I am aware of.

A little tip. Try to use either a soft hand additive or some other kind of light weight ink and that the garment is heavy enough not to bleed through. We have run into this on a number of runs.
 

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Hey Charles,

The reason I posted was to show people how to avoid some of the process that you do ie: a screen for each size & having to turn the shirts inside out. I dont have to do any of that with the method Ive posted. :)

As for country of origin, Ive left the tags on my shirts as you can see in the pics. Most people rip them off when they buy a shirt anyway leaving my printed tag on the neck.

Thanks,
Tom
 
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