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Most of the shirts you see in the shops are actually plastisol printed.
It's the most durable method of printing shirts, but you need to print 100 or more copies to make it cheap. Many places just stock plastisol transfers and apply then on shirts on demand. You can print CMYK + White (5 colors) with it, and even more colors if you want, but price goes up with each color you are adding.
Yes but are you sure that plastisol prints are the most durable? Acutally sublimation is the most durable and as far as i know plastisol transfers are just screen prints on silicon paper, they pit adhesive poweder on it directly after the screen print. I read hundreds of articles about screen printing in the last days and they all say direct screen print is more durable.

Sublimation on tri blends dould be a cheap method and its the most durable and has by far the highest resolution. Of course only if you want that vintage effect which alot of people including myself wear.

Plastisol transfers can be a chesp solution as well if you buy like 80 of them and in 2-3 colors max which is enough in my mind. So a mix of sublimated shirts and plastisols can be a good solution. I however want so try basic and cheap screen printing myself, i just use sign vinyl instead of the UV burning but of course you are limited to basic logos and fonts in one color, some designs dont need more. I also have sublimation equipment and HTV Equipment at home but more as a hobby
 

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are you sure that plastisol prints are the most durable?
Yes... They are!
Screen-printed transfers are not as good as direct screen-printing, but some of them are almost as good.
Not necessarily plastisol though...other types of ink may be used.



Actually sublimation is the most durable
Err...
1. The shirts are black, and
2. Nobody mentioned polyester.
 

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Yes... They are!
Screen-printed transfers are not as good as direct screen-printing, but some of them are almost as good.
Not necessarily plastisol though...other types of ink may be used.



Err...
1. The shirts are black, and
2. Nobody mentioned polyester.
I wasnt refering to the two designs he showed, just in general since he already owns sublimation equipment.
Nobody mentioned cotton as well, i was just saying that poly blends and sublimation is a great way of printing shirts at home for the customers that dont want black shirts. On top of that its the most durable method and with really high resolution/details. Especially for vintage designs. White tri blends are not even needed, grey or olive shirt and a black faded print can also look nice.

Another Idea is screen printing basic designs at home with sign vynil and a plotter. You dont always need complex graphics to sell i guess. Those screen printing machines are like 60 euro here on ebay, a screen is also not that expensive. Since he already has a heat press its a nice way of printing some shirts at home and use the heat press to fix them
 

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I wasnt refering to the two designs he showed, just in general since he already owns sublimation equipment.
Well, I'm sure he already knows about sublimation then.
No point for me suggesting it when the thread is about black shirts AND designs with a lot of white color.


Generally speaking sublimation is durable, but has way too many limitations. Screen-printing on the other hand has no limitations and can be combined with other printing methods, including sublimation.
 

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Sublimation on tri blends dould be a cheap method and its the most durable and has by far the highest resolution.

I wouldn't exactly call triblends cheap. It's one of the most expensive shirts available.

Hi resolution is lost sublimating on blends after the first wash when half the ink washes out of the garment. That's how you get that vintage look you like so much.
 

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I wouldn't exactly call triblends cheap. It's one of the most expensive shirts available.

Hi resolution is lost sublimating on blends after the first wash when half the ink washes out of the garment. That's how you get that vintage look you like so much.
You got that wrong, it was about printing methods with low cost equipment because he obviously dont want to buy a DTG printer which make sense. Even when you sublimate on 50% cotton the resolution is higher, its just a washed out look. Especially when you use dark colors. The point is you can still print a photo but with a washed out look, looks pretty good. I even add more used effects in affinity. Of course screen printing is a nice method, i will also try that at home but the resolution isnt comparable. Plastisol transfers could be an option fir him if he buys alot of them at once, then they are cheaper but if he biys only 10 it would make no sense, at least here in germany plastisol transfers are expensive in low numbers.
 

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JMO, but if a client were to bring this art to us we would suggest:

BUDDY - remove glow from behind the dog's head, to help the image pop more. If you do this, soften the edges of the image a bit so it doesn't look cut-and-paste.

OLD SCHOOL - Lots of mid-tones here, maybe brighten/add white highlights on chrome and headlights. Darken the back tires to make them drop back and add some depth. Darken the underside of the front tires, so the car doesn't look like it's floating in space.

Have you worn your designs to car shows, dog parks, animal adoption events? For the unbiased public feedback.
 
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