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I have followed this build:
http://www.t-shirtforums.com/screen-printing/t53718-10.html
and now I am having a hard time figuring out how to register the screens.

I dont really know how to go about placing the screens on the pallet to ensure that they are aligned for printing.

before exposing the screens are registered to each other... but after, there seems to be about 1/8to 1/4 inch of shift....

How do you register your screens? Do I need to build another jig to make sure the screens fit physically the same way each time? or some sort of grid?
 

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It depends. Try trace the cause of the 1/8-1/4 shift in alignment. Could it be due to minor "wiggles" in your press?

Also try loosening the tee nut and elevator bolts, realign your screens on all print head, then retightening the elevator bolts. Try rotating your press several times and swing the screen down each time see if the registration changes.
 

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Aside from all of the opportunities for "movement" in a wooden press, it's been my experience that it's difficult to get the image on a screens, then the screens on the press, in such a way that registration is perfect. Most professional registration systems for commercially made presses don't even promise that. I've got a factory registration system and frame jig that never "perfectly" lined up screens. If anyone ever comes up with a combo that worked that well, you wouldn't ever need a press with micros.
Looking at the design of the press, the registration gate, and the jig that screws to the end of the frames, quite likely you have just enough play to throw an image out of registration as much as you're seeing. And, by screwing that registration jig on the end of the screen, it seems to me that it precludes any side-to-side adjustment of the screen to bring it into registration. The concept isn't bad, but in the real world, getting two or more screens perfectly registered before they even hit the press is iffy.
 

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My press is based on those plans, and registration is definitely the biggest pain about that design. It takes a little practice and shims to get good registration. Once it's all lined up, I don't have any problems with it going out of reg, as long as the screens are tightly clamped in place.

Some things to keep in mind: hold the screen in place as you tighten the clamps, the screen can shift a little as you tighten them down. Check to see if all your press arms come to rest in the same spot relative to your platen. It's pretty easy to have a 1/16 inch or more variation with a DIY press. Thus, even if you position your films onto each screen with the highest precision, it won't matter because your press isn't lined up exactly.

I found one thread on here where the printer would tape a paper copy of the design on the platen. He then lined up the film with the copy and put some pieces of scotch tape on it, so that the sticky side was up. Then the coated and unexposed screen was clamped in place. Next, he simply lowers the screen down onto the film and presses down so the tape sticks to the screen. Now that film is exactly where you want it on the screen, ready for exposure. Repeat this process with the other films making sure you note which arm you're using with each screen. When you're ready to print, clamp the screens into the same arms that you used to line up the films, and you should barely need to do any registering at all. This method made registering with my DIY press A LOT easier.

This may seem a little time consuming at first, but it only takes me 5 or 10 minutes to do, and saves me far more time down the road. Note that this method can really only work if your press is in a light safe environment, or can be made light safe.

Hope this helps.
 

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I have a line table set up like they use in Asia I don't really use my carousel anymore. This is the most accurate system I've seen yet you could probably make it for next to nothing. I burn my screens in all in unison using a simple jig I then just print no moving left to right up and down. I've used this thousands of times and I've yet to move my screens after exposure. The beauty of this is you can print as many colours as you like you aren't limited to the amount of print heads like a carousel. If anyone wants to see how I do this pm me and I will send pics.
 

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My press is based on those plans, and registration is definitely the biggest pain about that design. It takes a little practice and shims to get good registration. Once it's all lined up, I don't have any problems with it going out of reg, as long as the screens are tightly clamped in place.

Some things to keep in mind: hold the screen in place as you tighten the clamps, the screen can shift a little as you tighten them down. Check to see if all your press arms come to rest in the same spot relative to your platen. It's pretty easy to have a 1/16 inch or more variation with a DIY press. Thus, even if you position your films onto each screen with the highest precision, it won't matter because your press isn't lined up exactly.

I found one thread on here where the printer would tape a paper copy of the design on the platen. He then lined up the film with the copy and put some pieces of scotch tape on it, so that the sticky side was up. Then the coated and unexposed screen was clamped in place. Next, he simply lowers the screen down onto the film and presses down so the tape sticks to the screen. Now that film is exactly where you want it on the screen, ready for exposure. Repeat this process with the other films making sure you note which arm you're using with each screen. When you're ready to print, clamp the screens into the same arms that you used to line up the films, and you should barely need to do any registering at all. This method made registering with my DIY press A LOT easier.

This may seem a little time consuming at first, but it only takes me 5 or 10 minutes to do, and saves me far more time down the road. Note that this method can really only work if your press is in a light safe environment, or can be made light safe.

Hope this helps.
This is how I was taught to set up my screens. Another thing that I do is mark my head number on the screen. If color one is on head 2 I make sure, that when I'm ready to print, I put it back on head 2. I think it make a difference.
 

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I built the same press and have no problem with registration at all. What I do, is when lining up the screens, I line it up with a printout taped to the spot on the platen I want the print to hit...tighten down...then lift just enough so it doesn't come out of the reg. gate...then drop screen...readjust, and tighten down.

Do this till when you drop screen it always hits the marks. Repeat for all screens...then when printing, drop each screen from the same height as you did when registering it, and you'll hit your mark every time.

It may seem from my explanation, to be a time consuming process, but I assure you it takes less time to do it than to explain it.
 
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