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Re: Average income?

I am really curious to how much you guys make a year just for the selling of shirts and etc. Is it really possible to break a million just on selling shirts? I was talking to some of the local owners around my area and I was surprised as to the fact that they were hauling a huge amount of money in every year.

So I got curious as to how much you fellows make a year? I just started and I am only looking at a few hundred a month, around $200-$300.

I know this is kind a private question so if you dont feel like sharing i dont blame you and you can just tell me a range too.


Thanks guys.

Ben.
Ben,
Here is something I found that was written by another person, Pat Baldes, who I believe now has a consulting business, you can probably google her if you have more questions, but this is what she had to say about profitability with t-shirts. Keep in mind that she is talking about heat press options, not direct screenprinting.
I know it is hard to find information about pricing and what you can earn, so I saved this. She goes into a pricing breakdown that someone did further on in the article. Here is what she wrote:
Heat printing is a very profitable part of Holly Jene Designs, Inc., a personalization business based in Harrison Township, Michigan. (Welcome to Holly Jene Designs homepage!!!) Owned by the Ewald sisters, Chris and Leslie, the business has been servicing the area for almost 20 years. Their heat press, a Hotronix Swinger, has been with them almost as long. It has a prominent position in the front of the shop. According to Chris, Les is the heat print expert as well as the head embroiderer. Chris and Les share most of the other responsibilities and have both worked hard to make their business grow while working at other jobs.

What started as a garage-based screen printing service is now a thriving multi-service business located in a busy marina area near Mt. Clemens, Michigan. Because of their location they cater to the boating population and their high quality embroidery is a favorite with boat owners. However, they soon realized they had to offer a variety of different applications in order to satisfy all their customer’s needs. Chris told me she has personalized everything from shirts or jackets to boat seat covers, towel and even a boat cover. The boat cover was a little large for the embroidery machine but the job was reasonably easy when they used heat pressed lettering to complete it.

The project we are going to outline this month is one of the most basic and profitable services you can offer. This particular job wasn’t even related to the boating community, but was a walk-in job for the local junior high school student council. The school was looking for some kind of identification that council members could wear on meeting days to acknowledge their position. It was a simple request and all it took was a knowledge of where to get tie-dyed shirts in youth sizes. The school chose a navy blue tie-dye and it was decided to use red and white lettering on the front.

Chris has spent a considerable amount of time developing a pricing binder that can be used to give quotes by any one of their staff. The graph follows the shirt cost, percentage of markup, charge for personalization and number of locations on the garment. Pricing is determined by quantity of garments purchased, with prices for a single piece and breaks at 6-23 pieces and so on.

In this particular case the shirts ran $4.25 each wholesale and the customer price was $9 each. Because of the number ordered and that it was for the school then discounted 5% bring the cost to $8.55 per shirt. The lettering was added to the shirt using pre-cut CAD-CUT® names. In this case, the lettering read “Student Council” in 3” lettering and the had the school’s name below in 2” lettering. The cost to order the pre-cut lettering from a service company is about $2.70 and the customer was billed $7.75 less discount, for a total of $7.36.

The total cost to produce the initial order for 24 shirts was $166.80. The customer’s bill was $15.91 per shirt or $381.84. The total time to complete the order was probably somewhere between two and three hours. They are currently working on a reorder for the customer for another fifteen shirts for the new council members coming in the new semester at school. The question is, can this become a profitable part of the Holly Jene business model? The answer is overwhelmingly yes!!!

The moral of the story is that with a heat press in your business, profits are out there waiting for you. If you were to make $5 profit per garment and were able to get order for two hundred shirts per week, and work fifty weeks out of the year, your business would have a $50,000 net profit in a year. The opportunity is there. The hard work will be getting orders for the shirts. That has to be a primary focus, because without orders there is no business. Once you have the orders for shirts you will need a heat press. Prices range from $750 to $1600 for a good dependable machine. The cut lettering service is readily available from service companies like Stahls’, Wellington House or Imprintables Warehouse. They offer the information on the product, how to use it, and are available 24/7 on the web. The service you offer can go way beyond names depending on what your customer is looking for. Team names, company names, clip art and even logos are available for your use. At some point you may decide to add a cutter to your business that can allow you to control the production and delivery more efficiently. The price for a cutter ranges between $1500 and $2000. Once your order volume grows sufficiently, you will be able to pay for a cutter in no time. The sky is the limit.
 

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Re: Average income?

Hi, I just wanted to give you the heads up that I moved this post out of the forums. For copyright reasons it's better to link to articles rather than quoting them in full.
 
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