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just need confirmation on this two t-shirts, went to a screen printer yesterday with the exact shirts. he told me both of the shirts where done in halftones. but on this forums members told me it was simulated process or index separation. so the million dollar question is. are these t's done in halftone,simulated process or index separation.
 

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Can't see much of the tone details but if can make a closer shot of the print so we can easily recognize the process.

Top of it all, with regards to your design it can be done with both simulated process or index process. If the print is done with halftones then the process is called simulated printing.

Simulated uses halftones with different sizes of dot ellipses resulting to a gradient print effect.

Index do not use halftone, it is dithered or square dots with all of the same sizes.

Nice prints by the way.
 

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I agree it is really hard to tell from these shots which is which or what real process was used.. People (printers and artists) who use one method or the other really get into heated discussions over which works best for various issues.. Index sometimes takes more screens and colors to get similar effects but really is killer when it works.. 4color process is still the way a lot of folks print to get realistic results and good color, flesh in particular.. These look like a lot of black to grey and then teh watermellon and jewels look short on color and detail.. would bet on simulated which is really just a vector version that more folks can work with and seperate at home
dlac
 

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I would just do these as 2-color Halftone screens...

I believe that you can burn this on 230 mesh and make it work. All you need to do is set the DPI to match the dot pattern on the shirt.....?
 

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NO standard, What are you using to print your film possitives? I would start at 50DPI see if that is too big of a dot, if so go to a higher #, if it is too small go to a smaller number.
 

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i use those vellum type paper that are see through with a lazer printer. lol i was thinking more of regular printing that's why i said 600dpi. i'll try something out later and check my results. thanks
 

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It is Friday night in West Frankfort Illinois, we have been eating chicken wings and drinking beer so I am not at my best but 500 or 600 dpi in photoshop to print on a shirt is not happening... 300 dpi is pretty exciting.. putting it on 305's is hard work for pretty good printers.. there is some rule about how many dpi's times the screen mesh but I will have to look it up and not tonight.. keep in mind when we are printing on fabric about 40-50% of the art goes on the side of the thread so how high of dpi really matters... I have seen some pretty good stuff printed from 220dpi on 200 mesh screens.. Knock yourself out... start small and move up as your success builds
dlac
 

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Look guys, I'm talking about the postscript settings on the printer. We print out dots as big as 10 - 30 DPI, so when I say 60 I'm talking a pritty small dot. Ya'll may be talking about the default setting that comes with the printer. Just to be clear, I'm not talking about the generic printer setting.

The postscript settings should be a separate tab on the printer, spec. for postscript options, like DPI settings. If you set the DPI at 600, the dots will be so small that they will look like a solid area.

Don't know if this helps or confussed....?
 

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I would have used a 305-mesh screen with a halftone of 65 lpi (65 dot lines per inch). Your printer usually prints out at 600 DPI anyway, this is pretty much standard for printers.
Don't get DPI and lpi mixed up they are 2 different things.
In Photoshop:
When you make your image, make it at 200 - 300 dpi.
You will have to separate your colors since you have to halftone and make separate screens for each.
After separation choose your first color.
Go to Image> mode> choose gray scale
Go to Image> mode> Bitmap
Under Resolution:
In the output box enter 600 pixels/inch
Under the Method:
Choose Halftone Screen
Click on OK
In the next screen choices:
Halftone Screen
Frequency: Choose 65 lines/inch
Angle: 22.5 degrees
Shape: round
Hit OK.
Print out your first color positive
Now do the same for your next color.....

Do this for each one of the colors in your image.
You have 2 Halftone Screens
Make sure you add registration marks to help you line up your screens.
You are now printing simulated process.
 

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Ok then... First glass of wine for evening so better get this out of the way.. Next I guess we need to talk about squeege durometer, sharpness, pressure and speed.. Ink lay down, which color first, and so on and so forth.. What kind of WHITE shirts are we putting it on.. how much are we going to thin the inks... Man some days I miss that and then again I think I will go get another wine...
dlac
 
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