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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I just got back from one of Ryonets two day classes and really feel like I learned a lot and corrected a lot of things I could have been doing better, but only about 5% of the class applied or touched on WB ink which is what I primarily want to use.

My problem is that after 5 prints or so, ink starts to well up on the print side of the screen. It ends up laying down way too much ink, even through a 250 mesh screen. Maybe I'm pushing down too hard with my print stroke? Maybe my back flood stroke is too aggressive? When I lighten up on it, I end up with faced spots where I obviously didn't clear the screen, but I realize that the finesse of it comes over time.

I'm just wondering if I can do anything to avoid this if it's been a problem for anyone else because as soon as I try to wipe it off on the print side, I just end up smearing it and can't let it touch another garment without taking it off-press and really hosing it out, which screws with any production. Has anyone had this problem or been able to correct it on-press?
 

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Try a light flood ( both pressure on the screen and squeegee angle), and heavier print stroke that will clear the screen of ink.

What squeegee durometer are you using? Is the ink buildup on the underneath from that screen or from a previous one of a separate colour?
 

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also when doing your backflood don't do it with the screen down on the shirt. lift up the screen a couple of inches with one hand and use the other to lightly backflood.

also make sure you have enough off contact when printing. adjust the screen to be off the shirt by a smidge. i tape one of those plastic circles you pull out of a carton of half and half to the top of my frame (closest to me) when printing. if you don't have off contact everything will glob up on the print side.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
That's funny because I can never get a clear answer on off contact or on contact for wb ink. Both instructors at Ryonet were adamant that you print ON contact for wb. I've tried both and I have the same issue regardless but just thought I'd throw that out there for anyone else having issues.
 

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My brain says less contact between fabric and screen, less smudge. So off contact is good. What do you think?

Your problem is too much ink passing through, though, right? Higher squeegee durometer or mesh count would be my next bet if the above advise does not cure your issue.
 

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also when doing your backflood don't do it with the screen down on the shirt. lift up the screen a couple of inches with one hand and use the other to lightly backflood.

also make sure you have enough off contact when printing. adjust the screen to be off the shirt by a smidge. i tape one of those plastic circles you pull out of a carton of half and half to the top of my frame (closest to me) when printing. if you don't have off contact everything will glob up on the print side.
I had a similar problem where it seemed like the water based ink would flow a bit to the print side. The result was a blurry halo around the print... I wasn't sure if the ink was too runny or why the print side of the screen had ink starting to flow around the edges and depositing on the shirt like that.
 

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I had a similar problem where it seemed like the water based ink would flow a bit to the print side. The result was a blurry halo around the print... I wasn't sure if the ink was too runny or why the print side of the screen had ink starting to flow around the edges and depositing on the shirt like that.
Also check you emulsion is suitable for wb and the ink is not attacking the emulsion and breaking it down
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I know my emulsion is fine, but maybe a different squeegee would help. I'm not really experienced enough to really know exactly what effect more/less contact would create. I'm sure parroting the teachers in the class. Their reasoning was plastisol you want to lay on the shirt but wb you're driving INTO the shirt.
 

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Good your emulsion is ok.

I drive plastisol into the shirt - unorthadox, but my prints are smoother, lighter and sharper than anyone here who runs autos, so go figure. The industry is still learning a lot about how to print well. People now days are just more technically savvy than they used to be and more people are learning about how to adapt to get their desire results. A good print used to be a thick print. Now a lot is about lighter but still durable prints (both plastisol and waterbased).

I would still work with off contact - it's clear you are not driving all the ink from your flood into the shirt each time, isn't it? That's why you are getting a build up. So you need to either drive all the ink into the shirt with extra dry passes without a flood or load the screen with less ink. Loading less ink means higher mesh or lighter fill, wouldn't you think?
 

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.... Or your gasket between the shirt and screen sucks and ink is leaking through. Either insufficient bottom coat on the shirt side or insufficient downward pressure either the squeegee, or maybe even squeegee angle too close to horizontal?
 

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Good your emulsion is ok.

I drive plastisol into the shirt - unorthadox, but my prints are smoother, lighter and sharper than anyone here who runs autos, so go figure. The industry is still learning a lot about how to print well. People now days are just more technically savvy than they used to be and more people are learning about how to adapt to get their desire results. A good print used to be a thick print. Now a lot is about lighter but still durable prints (both plastisol and waterbased).

I would still work with off contact - it's clear you are not driving all the ink from your flood into the shirt each time, isn't it? That's why you are getting a build up. So you need to either drive all the ink into the shirt with extra dry passes without a flood or load the screen with less ink. Loading less ink means higher mesh or lighter fill, wouldn't you think?
What do you mean by "I drive plastisol into the shirt"? Are you applying more than normal pressure on your print pass? or are you doing more dry passes to clear the screen?
 

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Both! I make sure the screen is clear of ink and do so using much higher pressure than most use with very sharp and stiff squeegees, (6'2" and 200lbs on a push stroke)

Sometimes only 1 stoke, sometimes
2. Depends on ink thickness, room temp, print job length, screen tension and the false body of an ink
 

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Both! I make sure the screen is clear of ink and do so using much higher pressure than most use with very sharp and stiff squeegees, (6'2" and 200lbs on a push stroke)

Sometimes only 1 stoke, sometimes
2. Depends on ink thickness, room temp, print job length, screen tension and the false body of an ink
same here. i use a sharp square edge stiff squeegee no matter what ink i'm using.

i also only do one pass if i'm printing dark inks on light colored shirts. the white on dark requires a couple of passes (no matter what ink...wb or plastisol). i do a pass up and back then flash and repeat.

carlwood: it's crazy you went up to train at ryonet and you still left with questions. you should do yourself a favor and buy their dvd on water base and discharge printing it helped me out a lot. they also have a ton of video tuts on youtube.

also, you are spraying the platen with adhesive before printing correct?
 
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