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ok, now let me remember some random information from all of my years in art school...i'm guessing that this rule (if i even remembered it correctly) can apply to inks the same way it applies to paints.

light colored inks have a low viscosity due in part to the lack of pigments. the higher the pigment count, the higher the viscosity, and the more fluid your ink will be. knowing that, you have to adjust accordingly:

as far as you getting patchy deposits, like was mentioned above, evenly distribute your pressure. maybe your squeegee is the wrong size for the design. when working with thick inks, i like to alternate my ink deposits in my passes. the first pass i will lightly run the squeegee over the image so there is A LOT of ink, the next one i apply a lot of pressure to scrape off the excess and to sink it into the fibers. i do that once more and it usually works really well.

to me, it seems like a bad idea to flash the ink and then do another pass. it doesn't have fibers to absorb into or latch onto, so it just kinda sits on the surface. just like how you're not supposed to pour wet concrete onto concrete that's already cured.
 

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LeeHuff said:
I am having this problem too. I'm using Triangle Ink also. I really hate it because it makes the print feel rough. I know there has to be a way to fix it. Any help will be greatly appreciated.
maybe you have a super aggressive hand- rawr! i dunno...

but my white ink is really rough too. whenever a customer asks for white ink, i try and get them to use the Union Extra Soft Lite Grey in place of it. for one, it's much softer, two- i personally think white ink is too harsh and played out on most colors. this makes it a little interesting. so far the results have been faaaabulous.
 
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