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How do you make sure the dye on the shirt will not bleed through the white ink?

I know about low bleed ink and I use it whenever printing on a poly or blended shirt. But last time I used it on a camouflage shirt the camouflage dye still bled through the ink. Back then I was using some low bleed ink that I got from Ryonet. I am now using all Rutland inks which I find are a better quality. Do you have any other tips for me to make sure I don't get the bleed-through? any other tips are welcome.

Thanks!
 

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Are you curing at the proper temp? If you happen to be real high in temp it will also bleed through a poly ink.
 

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We had a 2500 piece camo job to do a couple weeks ago and we had to get it right and eliminate the bleeding or we'd have to eat all of those shirts, and this ain't the time to be printing and paying for 2500 shirts and nobody paying for them. I've printed many camo's over the years and I can say the best, maybe only real sure fire option is to use a "gray", special low bleed underbase ink. Wilflex has a special underbase grey that worked way better than any other low bleed or poly white ink. I mixed in a little low bleed white ink into the gray to make it slightly easier to print, maybe 10%. It is like trying to print with bubble gum it's so thick. The shirts had the underbase grey and 5 top colors including a highlight white and there was absolutely no sign of bleed. You can try and get away with using a low bleed white or poly ink but you'll get the best results with the wilflex underbase gray, low bleed.
 

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it's called dye migration and it is a heat issue most often.. I believe the magic number needs to be 330 degrees for 20 seconds for proper curing.. get yourself one of those laser guns and check what temp the actual print is the second it comes out from under the drying elements of your dryer
 

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I am now using all Rutland inks
Go with Rutland's Dyno series inks. Start with their DynoWhite and if that's not adequate, DynoGrey has never failed me even on polyester shirts that migrate like crazy. You'll need to push these inks through a low mesh (recommendation is 110 or less, I've found 230 works if you play with some angle/pressure).

It also helps to run the shirts through the dryer first to "cure" the dye that wasn't cured at the factory.
 

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personally i would try a white intended for 100% poly as they have the best dye migration fighting chemicals in them. Not just any bleed resistant white. I wouldn't hesitate to try grey either, just never have, and I'll bet a color bleeding through to a grey rather than a white would look less obtrusive than bleed through on white would. Have had the most success with wilflex polywhite, and Rutland polywhite, though it's been a long time since i've used the Rutland.
 

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Depending on detail use a 110 mesh with a good thick stencil 1/2 wet over wet application of a good pure photopolymer emulsion. Print flash print. Rutlands new NPT super poly white would work, or One Strokes' LB Premium. I can't speak to any others. To echo, don't overheat in the cure or the flash!


Does anyone know what method is used for Camo dying? It seems like it must be sublimated. Or is it WB screened on uncut fabric?
 
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