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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
im usually printing white on black shirts. ive done a few white shirts before.

what screen mesh should i use for spot colors on white?? i assume the red and black are very thin inks and i dont want it to bleed.

should i p/f/p?? multiple strokes then flash?

how much off contact for white shirts?

Thanks
 

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Partially depends on the hand you are shooting for and how much detail you need to hold in your design. Sorry I don't do much plastisol so what info I would give would be a shot in the dark.

Have you tried any experimentation and logging of results. I keep a log with pictures of every screen I run, how I coated it, how I printed with it, all the technical details o I can go back and compare results and make things better.

Just my two cents. Toss them in a well and make a wish.
 

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yeah give me white shirts with 1 ink/1 location all day and I'd be happy.
Just print and Cure. No need to P/F/P or even double stroke. You could use any mesh you want really, but I would say anything in the 110's and up to 200. I do most of my printing on 110s, but I do like to print with 158's as well.
 

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yeah give me white shirts with 1 ink/1 location all day and I'd be happy.
Just print and Cure. No need to P/F/P or even double stroke. You could use any mesh you want really, but I would say anything in the 110's and up to 200. I do most of my printing on 110s, but I do like to print with 158's as well.
Right? Every time someone asks me for a quote on a white shirt I am ready to do a back flip. The irony of it to me, the people who have this order almost always are the least demanding, easiest to work with. Maybe it's because they haven't seen the evil side of printers because they know how to make us happy ;)
 

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Right? Every time someone asks me for a quote on a white shirt I am ready to do a back flip. The irony of it to me, the people who have this order almost always are the least demanding, easiest to work with. Maybe it's because they haven't seen the evil side of printers because they know how to make us happy ;)
I'd gladly do white shirts with any color ink all day every day forever. They are profitable and the least headaches(as far as printing, films, screens, etc).
I've even done quick orders of a dozen or so for smaller businesses and still didn't mind. Until I upgrade my press and exposure unit I'll be happy to keep doing single color orders like this. Multi-color orders get exponentially more difficult with my current setup.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
oh also, its for the customers work crew. they do painting and the shirts might get washed once a week maybe more. what is the best way to make the print last through so many washes without fibrilation??
 

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oh also, its for the customers work crew. they do painting and the shirts might get washed once a week maybe more. what is the best way to make the print last through so many washes without fibrilation??

i'm not sure if you are using the word fibrilation correctly or I'm just really really tired. Can you explain what you are trying to prevent the shirt from doing?

as far as keeping a quality print...Make sure you fully cure the ink. I have Tshirts from when I started printing in '08 that are still in great condition and they have been through 75+ washes.
 

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oh also, its for the customers work crew. they do painting and the shirts might get washed once a week maybe more. what is the best way to make the print last through so many washes without fibrilation??
Good screens, (a slightly thicker stencil helps,) a press that is in planar calibration, a flat platen, even tack, quality ink, a sharp squeegee, a proper flood-print sequence, and good curing practices. Just like any other print you want to do well. :)

You could PFP but you're killing the hand, wasting time, and wasting ink.
 

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Good screens, (a slightly thicker stencil helps,) a press that is in planar calibration, a flat platen, even tack, quality ink, a sharp squeegee, a proper flood-print sequence, and good curing practices. Just like any other print you want to do well. :)

You could PFP but you're killing the hand, wasting time, and wasting ink.
I wouldn't use any tack either. I'm printing 20,000 white tees 4 colors and no tack on the boards.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
by fibrillation, i mean after they wash it, white fibers begin to show through the colors.

the other fibrillation is printing white on black shirts. where the fibers are making the print really rough as you print.
 

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I wouldn't use any tack either. I'm printing 20,000 white tees 4 colors and no tack on the boards.
With plastisol?

I would use a minimum of tack--but that's just me. I find it to be difficult to get a proper snap-off with no tack--except perhaps with 4c process, but even then you can get little shifts that will destroy your dot pattern...
 

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With plastisol?

I would use a minimum of tack--but that's just me. I find it to be difficult to get a proper snap-off with no tack--except perhaps with 4c process, but even then you can get little shifts that will destroy your dot pattern...
Yes with plastisol. Running 4 spot colors all wet. With 20k shirts, front and back every second counts per shirt. Have no issues with print except for lint, which seems to be getting worse all the time.
 
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