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Hi,

I'm new to this forum and my wife and I are starting up some retail apparel lines in So Cal. Silkscreening is ridiculously expensive at low volumes especially since we want to do some 4-color process designs, and we have had some designs printed on a t-jet but they just don't have the vibrancy we'd like.

I've read that you can print on specialty t-shirt vinyl with printers like a Roland Color Camm or another on their site, Roland Heatwave.

I went to a sign supply store and the dealer kind of gave me a blank look.

Does anyone know if you can do 4-color process vinyl transfers for t-shirts? Would a sign printer with such equipment being willing to do this?

Also, if anyone knows of businesses in So. Cal that can do this, please let me know.

Any help sure is appreciated.

- Doug
 

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There was a similar question to this earlier, and a point was made that since the heat transfer vinyl is placed face down, the side that will be visible after pressing is covered by the backing. Everything designed using heat transfer vinyl is cut in reverse (mirror image) so that it is right side up after application. So, I don't think you can do this using conventional heat transfer vinyls.

However, that Roland Heatwave system is interesting. They do mention jerseys, but the site says it's a dye sublimation process, and dye sub inks do not work with 100% cotton garments if I remember correctly. They go on to mention cotton and cotton blends and post these steps...
For cotton or cotton-blend garments (both light and dark colored):

1. Print/cut a digital image using the HeatWave system, HeatWave sublimation ink, Heat Transfer Media and Roland software sublimation profiles.
2. Put the freshly printed and cut image on top of the sublimation-ready surface and place them together in a heat press.
3. Press the image and the substrate according to the recommended time and temperature settings (typically 350 degrees for approximately 10 seconds) and remove it for a bright and durable finished product.

I'm wondering if they are printing the images onto a clear heat transfer vinyl.
 

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The t-jet guy you used likely printed the file you sent him. He did not enhance the file before printing. (brightness, contrast, saturation, etc.) He may not have laid down enough ink either. If you have a relationship with him, go back and see what he will do to get you a better print. Or, try someone else. I don't think it is the machine at fault. Just an opinion.
 

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Decal_Designs said:
I'm wondering if they are printing the images onto a clear heat transfer vinyl.
I've heard of this, but never really seen any information on it (though admittedly I haven't perused it as much as I probably should have). I heard it called 'Subliflock'; basically, as you say - you print on to vinyl via sublimation and then apply the vinyl to the shirt with a press. This would let you have the colors of a digital trasnfer available on dark shirts; the only downside would be cost and weeding.
 

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Twinge said:
I heard it called 'Subliflock'; basically, as you say - you print on to vinyl via sublimation and then apply the vinyl to the shirt with a press. This would let you have the colors of a digital trasnfer available on dark shirts; the only downside would be cost and weeding.
Thanks for everyone's help on this. I queried on subliflock and almost everything came up in a foreign language. There was another transfer material called COLOR PRINT that says it is for use with thermal transfer printers such as ROLAND COLOR CAMM.

I was thinking that the quality of the print would be really great if you could use such a printer and was hoping someone on this forum had experience with this.

- Doug
 

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ColorPrintnew by Siser is how I started printing shirts ~ been in the sign business for 20 yrs ~ but definately a novice w/ tees ~ I print on my gerber edge ~ you can print on a Roland or a Mamki printer as well ~ but there are 2 different types of colorprint transfer material ~ one is for thermal transfer (gerber edge printer) the other is for solvent printers (roland & mamki) ~ both print beautifully & I have pressed 1000 or so shirt with ColorPrint new for the thermal printers
I have a couple of high volume customers that are restaurants & this is so much more affordable than embroidery
I am finding however on the restuarant tees that get washed on a (near) daily bases that the vinyl does crack & color fades over time.
I've spent hours searching this forum ~ to find out if anyone has experience with this media (I'm not sure if I'm not pressing correctly ~ time ~ temp ~ pressure) or if daily washing is the problem ~ I have consulted the Siser US rep a few time ~ but I think it may be time to corner him again
The only other material I've used is Translutions by New Wave Media ~ switch I LOVE!!!!! but they haven't got their print on colored shirts media release yet & nobody in the resturant business wants white shirts that can't be bleached!!!!
I've recently purchased both an epson 1280 & R1800 to print translutions on
Again from what I can see there isn't much talk on the forum about Translutions yet either ~ but any imput on either on of these products would be GREATLY appreciated!
thanx for being here ~ this forum is the best thing since sliced bread!!!!!!!!!!!!!
Laura
metro atlanta
 
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