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Discussion Starter #1
i have an order for some womens tank tops(ribbed) thye design they give me woill require me to print on the side of the tank top, wel more like the side/bottom.

my question is what is the best way to do this? can i just put the tank top on the platen side ways and align the screen to print where i need?
 

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I've actually done this- printing over the side seam. And what I did was, really secure the seam so it can't move- I just used masking tape in a spot where I wasn't printing. Then I pulled the squeegee with A LOT OF PRESSURE. And it went over the seam... seamlessly!


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Hi Guys,
If you are priting over the seam, another thing to try if you are hand priting is a layer of fleecy on the pallet under the garment. The fleecy has a little give in it so the singlet sideseam is able to sit down a bit when you apply the squeegee pressure and there is less bleeding around the seam. Also, try thickening your inks, having the finest mesh that will still give you enough coverage and only pulling the squeegee one way.
Kenneth
 

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i have an order for some womens tank tops(ribbed) thye design they give me woill require me to print on the side of the tank top, wel more like the side/bottom.

my question is what is the best way to do this? can i just put the tank top on the platen side ways and align the screen to print where i need?
If this is a large order then you may want to take the time to make a custom platen for the job.
I made one that I use for seam jobs, I routered an 1/8" grove into platen so the seam sits even with the rest of the shirt, And a added benefit was that every thing lines up automatically.

Just a thought...
 

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Along the lines of Billy's idea, when printing across seams, I retrofit my regular platen to function like Billy's by taping down two pieces of card board (matte board works the best for me) and arrange them parallel to each and an 1/8"-1/4" apart, thus making a groove for the seam to sit in. And generally I find it helps to thin the ink.

Mike
 

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Along the lines of Billy's idea, when printing across seams, I retrofit my regular platen to function like Billy's by taping down two pieces of card board (matte board works the best for me) and arrange them parallel to each and an 1/8"-1/4" apart, thus making a groove for the seam to sit in. And generally I find it helps to thin the ink.

Mike
Yep...
I have done that successfully as well...
 

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For the cardboard idea, you want the seam to sit at the same level as the rest of the shirt, if it is sitting below the shirt level it might not print. Also, it looks like your ink is pretty thick, I would recommend thinning it for both printing on seams and the ribbed garment you are printing on.

I've had trouble printing corrugated cardboard, as it can show the corrugated texture, I prefer to use chipboard (like the stuff that is the backing on pad of paper) or matte board. They are both smooth enough, and can be layered for the desired thickness.

I hope this helps.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
Time is a big issue on this print. I don't have anything to thin the ink and don't have time to go get it. I did get a better print this morning But i still had a little bit of a messy print in the center. Here is a pic of it it's not lined up completely yet I'm just tryin to get the seam down
 

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