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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello all, I post this in this section of the forum because I know this issue is not related to the printer I own. I'm having some trouble with the t-shirts printed images after a few washes, some of them peel off (I've read the forum like crazy, the cause seems to be too much pretreat) but this one is new for me, cracks (I've attached some pictures), and just after 3 or 4 washes (don't know how it's been washed, the costumer washed it), does someone here knows why this may have happened?, or some suggestion?
My pretreat method:
-2 light layers of 100% pretreatment
- Brush the fibers down
- Heat press with heavy pressure and quilon paper for 30secs
Curing method:
- Light pressure 350f for 90secs
- Open the heatpress, turn the silicone paper the other side
- Another 90secs 350f
And I'm using dupont inks.

I'll highly appreciate any help!!
Thanks!
 

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I also know that this happened to me when I layed too much white ink down. Whenever my white layer was thick enough that the final cure left it feeling more like a heat transfer than a DTG print it always cracked.

I found that the best results came from just enough white ink to create a good solid cover over the material but not any more.
I have shirts I printed for myself that are a year old and washed weekly and they still look almost as good as the day I printed them.

I suppose pretreats could have different reccomendations for curng but...30 seconds seems too long especially since you final cure at 350 I would assume the same heat for the pretreat? So that definately would seem way too long or even too hot to me IMHO

I press once for 10-12 seconds with parchment then remove the parchment and hit it again for 10-12 seconds and that usually does it. Although I adjust by looking at the amount of steam coming off the second cure and what the shirt looks like. i only press long enough to cure. Since I hand spray there is a small variance between shirts that requires I adjust the second cure...I may drop the press down for another 3-5 seconds additional if it has alot of steam and an obvious damp area.

I also have not seen any pretreat that requires heavy pressure either. I only use enough pressure to cure the pretreat. heavy pressure always seemed to scorch and was the biggest cause behind a bounding box left behind.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Mmm, it may be that, but I'm not sure, I think it has 2 layers of white (underbase + highlight), and I use heavy pressure because it seems like the only way to press those fibers down for good :s
 

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Mmm, it may be that, but I'm not sure, I think it has 2 layers of white (underbase + highlight), and I use heavy pressure because it seems like the only way to press those fibers down for good :s
Well two passes of white does not mean it is too much white.....and it may not even be an issue. To me it was a matter of laying too much down in one pass...so much that I could see a little pooling of the white ink.

The fibers sticking up was a pain for a while I think but I never had to resort to heavy pressure. I only mentioned it because i never saw anything that got better using heavy pressure...usually it made things worse.

I do know some shirts were worse than others for fibers....like Port and Company..their 6.1 oz tees were hairy little buggers...they needed a shave...I even contemplated a way to try and do that..then i just went to a different shirt.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I wish I could use the brands you have over there but I'm stuck to what I can find in my country, I've tried all the brands available here, I've found one that works good, but all of them have this fiber issue unfortunately, the pressure seems to help with the brush technique, what worries me is this cracking issue, I think the layers of white were pretty light, because I was using a profile that reduces the ink usage to half "production mode", thanks for your help, and suggestions
 

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shughey, if what you are doing is working for you, then keep doing it...but...in general, you do want heavy pressure when curing the pretreat. scorching and a visible box is the result of too much pretreat and/or pressing right after spraying. i hover my heat press to evaporate the edges away and then i press with heavy pressure. i get a flat surface every time without the "box". you could also hang the shirts if you're doing a large run, and then press them while they're still damp.

many people use too much pretreat without realizing it. if your white ink is lightly pooling, then you're using enough. my guess is your shirt didn't get fully cured.
 

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shughey, if what you are doing is working for you, then keep doing it...but...in general, you do want heavy pressure when curing the pretreat. scorching and a visible box is the result of too much pretreat and/or pressing right after spraying. i hover my heat press to evaporate the edges away and then i press with heavy pressure. i get a flat surface every time without the "box". you could also hang the shirts if you're doing a large run, and then press them while they're still damp.

many people use too much pretreat without realizing it. if your white ink is lightly pooling, then you're using enough. my guess is your shirt didn't get fully cured.
Same as AA way. Nathasha Pretreat is biggest huddle when you pass this all will be piece of cake. Cheers!:) Female NeoFamily!
 

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shughey, if what you are doing is working for you, then keep doing it...but...in general, you do want heavy pressure when curing the pretreat. scorching and a visible box is the result of too much pretreat and/or pressing right after spraying. i hover my heat press to evaporate the edges away and then i press with heavy pressure. i get a flat surface every time without the "box". you could also hang the shirts if you're doing a large run, and then press them while they're still damp.

many people use too much pretreat without realizing it. if your white ink is lightly pooling, then you're using enough. my guess is your shirt didn't get fully cured.
Well....I suppose the same rule applies to you....if that works for you keep doing it.
However..atleast with the FastInk pretreat it goes out of the way to state to not use tight pclamp pressures.

I would have thought that the manufacturers would have a better idea of how to cure their product?

Possible everyones pretreat is diferent though....maybe mine says do not and others so do...who knows...

I do know that when I started to go by the manufacturers guidelines and not word of mouth the problems cleared up.

Anyway...what do i know I suppose...:)

Enjoy gentlemen.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I'm new at this but I think the pressure depends a lot on the t-shirt brand and quality, Sean can you please tell me how you cure your white ink t-shirts? Do you use the same temp to dry the pretreatment? Thanks again!
 

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i cure my pretreat at 330 until the steam goes away. if the shirt hangs for awhile and is just lightly damp, then 2 hits for 20 seconds is enough. if i want to print faster, then i may hover for 90 and then do 2 hits for 20 seconds. the main thing is to get the moisture out of the shirt.

i cure all my prints for 90 seconds at 330 degrees. your shirt had a lot of white ink on it, so more cure time may be needed, but i would be very surprised if 2 hits for 90 seconds weren't enough. did you just do one shirt for this customer? are other shirts cracking as well?
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 · (Edited)
I see, thanks for the info, going to try that setting when I get a chance. No I just made this one for him, this is the first time I get a cracked image after some washes, and the first time I use this much white, I cure it with a light pressure, maybe the heat didn't get to all the white?, I've read here on the forum that there are bad quality presses that requires med to high pressure in order to work properly, mine is a non brand Korean heatpress, so maybe that's the problem, I used light pressure in this one because sometimes the paper sticks to the print, wow you only use 330F? Peter suggested I try with 370F, my working space is very humid.
 

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I would have thought that the manufacturers would have a better idea of how to cure their product?

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Shughey,
If everyones shop was the same and used the same shirts etc..... there would be a scientific answer. However, there are lots of variables, so those have to be taken into concideration along with the recomendations.

novisbaby, You need to do some testing. My guess as well is that it's cure/ dwell time issue. If there is extra moisture in the environment on top of what is absorbed by putting pretreat and ink into the shirt, this will need to be dissipated by adjusting the time and heat . The first shirt of the day takes longer to cure always. A cool lower platten will dreaw away moisture and condense it never alowing the target temp to be reached. More ink=more moisture= more time to cure
 
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