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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a question about pressing a shirt on both sides. I have tried using a mousepad inside the shirt but have problems with the shirt scorching. When I press the original side, without the mousepad, the shirt presses fine. What am I doing wrong that is causing the scorching?

PS I am using white shirts and JPSS.
 

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It could be. Are you using a silicone mat when pressing and what color is the shirt. I have found that red shirts seem to look like they are scorthing afte rI get done just pressing one side but once the shirt cools it is okay.
 

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i put one teflon sheet down, and then the shirt, and one teflon sheet on the top, now you will have to let all cool, before you peel the teflon sheets off,.
When i have a 3 sided t-shirt,, i press the smallest first,and then the sleeve it, or turn it over and do the largest..
hope this helps.
Just protect the surface you pressed before and peel cold
 

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@ Donita
Have you ever tryed useing JPSS printed on one side of a T-shirt and then tryed printing on the back of the same shirt ?
If you did then you would know what will happen right away as i done it and the teflon sheet got stuck to the printed side and it takes a lair off the print.

@ mamaof2
What i found best for doing this was that i made a thin wooden insert, that is the same size of my platen, then sliped it in the sirt and then pressed the other side.
I now have a few home made thin metal plates that have rubber backing on one side, just used some spair mouse pads and walla, they work a treat.
Have got some long ones for sleevs made and logo circles and they work great.
Like mentioned above you will need ajust the platen if you throw in a mouse pad, as the platen will be higher and why you will get the scorching.
This is why i made inserts the same size as the platen so it gives heat off in the sections needed. ;)
 

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I would also say, only but one side of the shirt in the press. More like you where putting it on a pallet for silkscreening. So when you press the front the back is not inside the machine. And when you press the back the front is not in the machine.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I am using a teflon sheet and a white shirt. I'm pretty sure it has to do with the mousepad because the area that scorched is only where the mousepad was. Thanks for the suggestion on adjusting pressure--I'll give that a try and see if it helps.
 

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@ Donita
Well i`ve tryed tonight the same way as you mentioned, and found it to loose some of the grip ?
Not saying the way you do it is wrong, but just airing my own personal views on when i do it, and that it can be very easy to take a lair off of the seal if heat is applied to the same aeria where you previously printed on T-shirt.
Its like if you dont want to have the gloss or screen feel, you can put a plain pice of white paper down onto the printed aeria and picture, and just press for 10 seconds, and it will take a layer off it & make the picture feel rough.

@ marissa
I think you will find if you ajust for the mouse pad, that you wont get the scorched aeria ;) let us know how you get on :);)
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
How can you tell if it is fibre flattening? This had a light yellow/brown tint where the mousepad had been. It was very faint and almost not noticeable unless you were looking for it.

Thanks!
 

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How can you tell if it is fibre flattening? This had a light yellow/brown tint where the mousepad had been. It was very faint and almost not noticeable unless you were looking for it.

Thanks!
Fibre flattening looks a lot like scorching, it is also referred to as yellowing.
The only way to really be sure is to hit it with the fine mist of water.
If it is flattening, it will disapeer before your eyes when you give it the water-mist.
The water mist will not hurt the shirt, or the applied transfer. I leave it to dry naturally, then if it needs it, I will give the shirt a light ironing to give it that crisp-look.
This process also works well for platton marks , also due to fibre flattening.
 
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