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Discussion Starter #1
A client of mine (i'm a graphic designer) had a logo designed for him from a different designer. the logo is VERY thin script with gradients and drop shadows..

He plans on screen printing some t-shirts, tank tops, and undies and I was just curious as to what extent a screen printer can deal with gradients.

The file itself was created in photoshop, but I COULD reproduce it in illustrator if i had to - the unfortunately part is that the logo isn't much of anything without these "decorations"

So what are you suggestions? Are there any steps to take to make sure that the gradient comes out properly? Its a red to white back to red gradient that creates the ever popular shiny plastic look.
 

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would you happen to have an sample image?

if the design is too small, there may not be enough space/steps to do a decent gradient. ideally you want no less then a .25" distance or your gradient won't show up well. It maybe best to redo the graphic, change the gradients for cartoon highlights (think of old plastic cartoon block letters, the white glare is just a solid white line).
 

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I'm not allowed to share the actual image, but I can tell you that the logo uses this font:
Sloop® font family MyFonts (sloop script one)
adn this one:
ITC Kabel® font family MyFonts (medium weight)

here is an example of how the text kind of looks, although not QUITE as cheesy.
http://tutorialblog.org/amazing-text-shine/
The logo itself will be likely printed as big as we can get it.

A quick question not really related to screen printing, but can DTG give a more realistic effect with gradients and such?
 

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A quick question not really related to screen printing, but can DTG give a more realistic effect with gradients and such?
very similar, with DTG you will get finer detail resolution. With screen printing, if the shop is using high mesh counts (300+) you will hardly notice the halftone dots on close inspection. DTG will give you great gradients and if you only need a dozen or so units that maybe the way to go for you.
 
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