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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi everyone, I am brand new to this forum but I am in desperate need of help. I do not know anything about electrical or wiring but I am good at following direction and would really love to learn how to fix this problem on my own incase it happens again in the future (I don't want to have to just buy a new heatpress).

So anyway, about a week ago my power switch stopped working properly. It would constantly turn on/off by itself or sometimes not turn on at all. So I took off the backing to expose the wires and noticed that if I lifted the wires the press would power on. so I put a ruler under the wires then weighed the ruler down to basically make a seesaw and keep the wires raised. It might of not been the smartest idea but it worked and I was able to continue doing business. However, now two of the wires have fallen completely out of the switch (I've attached photos)

Is there anyway I can reattach these wires, and how? Will I still be able to buy a new switch and reattach wires?
 

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take those two ends with no wires off the switch and go to your local auto supply store and say you need a pack of these connectors

put exposed wire ends into the new connectors, insert the wires as far as they will go
take a pair of linesman pliers (or any pliers you have) and begin to apply pressure where the wire is inserted into the connector
keep applying pressure until you have a permanent clamp between the wire and the connector without breaking the connector

they do make special color-coded connector pliers that you simply put your blue connector in between the blue slots and press down (they might be cheap enough at the auto parts store to pick up a set (they are handy)

hopefully you remembered where the white and black goes on the switch, if not you will find out when you switch it on and it either works or pops your breaker (in which case switch the wire config)

just remember this:
a good mechanical connection is a good electrical connection
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
take those two ends with no wires off the switch and go to your local auto supply store and say you need a pack of these connectors

put exposed wire ends into the new connectors, insert the wires as far as they will go
take a pair of linesman pliers (or any pliers you have) and begin to apply pressure where the wire is inserted into the connector
keep applying pressure until you have a permanent clamp between the wire and the connector without breaking the connector

they do make special color-coded connector pliers that you simply put your blue connector in between the blue slots and press down (they might be cheap enough at the auto parts store to pick up a set (they are handy)

hopefully you remembered where the white and black goes on the switch, if not you will find out when you switch it on and it either works or pops your breaker (in which case switch the wire config)

just remember this:
a good mechanical connection is a good electrical connection
I will run to the auto store in a few hours once I'm out of work and give this a try. I hope I can get it to turn back on. I remember exactly where each color goes too.
I forgot to mention in the original post too that once the wires came unplugged they sparked very big and blew my fuse. The wires should still work correct? Or will they be fried?
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
the wires look fine

you are on fuses and not breakers?
must be an older home, check your fuse to ensure it is still groovy
Here's a better picture. The black one looks a little toasty. Do I just snip that off and then strip the wire back a little?
I don't know why I said fuse 😑I definitely have breakers😅
 

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While you are at it, check ALL the other connections you can get to. If any are lose, crimp them more tightly.

I recommend buying a proper crimping tool, as regular pliers will just squish it flat. A crimping tool will make a firm dent/crease while maintaining the connector's roundness--which keeps the wire in better contact with the connector.

Ineffective crimping at the factory is why those wires fell out. That is also why you should check all the connections, as very shoddy workmanship went into the assembly of this press. Tell us where it was made ... I bet we could never guess ;-)

If the press doesn't work after this, it might have an internal fuse that now needs to be replaced.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
yeah definitely get it back to some new wire if you have the length available
so it's turning on now but the original problem I had a while back is still happening. The heat press will stay on for a few seconds then turn off. It turns back on if I just ever so lightly touch the white wire and raise it up a couple mm. What's the deal? I'm trying electrical tape now to maybe keep the wire raised😕
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
While you are at it, check ALL the other connections you can get to. If any are lose, crimp them more tightly.

I recommend buying a proper crimping tool, as regular pliers will just squish it flat. A crimping tool will make a firm dent/crease while maintaining the connector's roundness--which keeps the wire in better contact with the connector.

Ineffective crimping at the factory is why those wires fell out. That is also why you should check all the connections, as very shoddy workmanship went into the assembly of this press. Tell us where it was made ... I bet we could never guess ;-)

If the press doesn't work after this, it might have an internal fuse that now needs to be replaced.
I'll look into that, thanks. And I know it's not a good press, it's some cheap china thing. But I just started a small at home business not too long ago and I mean it gets the job done. once I make enough money I'll buy a good quality press.
 

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I'd recommend either replacing the switch, or get yourself a cheap multimeter and try to track down whether the fault actually lies with the switch or the connecting wires and replace accordingly. Watch what you are touching in there, especially if there are any large capacitors that might, ... er, .... kill you!
 

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Two of the wires had a faulty terminal crimp, the wire should never be able to be pulled out of a terminal ever. All the terminal crimps were likely done by the same person with the same tool. If it were me i'd buy a good crimp tool (they're cheap) & re-crimp every terminal you can find. Crimp tools are cheap, house fires are not.
 

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Two of the wires had a faulty terminal crimp, the wire should never be able to be pulled out of a terminal ever. All the terminal crimps were likely done by the same person with the same tool. If it were me i'd buy a good crimp tool (they're cheap) & re-crimp every terminal you can find. Crimp tools are cheap, house fires are not.
Exactly :)
 

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if it turns on and stays on when lifting a wire, then it is a short somewhere
if it does not stay on, then it may be a faulty thermostat

i would try a new switch if after ensuring all connectors are satisfactorily secure mechanically, it still cycles off and on
you can also add a tiny drop of solder on the connectors and wire just below the spade that attaches to the switch

you do need to be careful, which it seems like you are
these are really just baseboard heaters with an electronic thermostat and an electronic timer (unless you have something like a swingman, then it is only an analog thermostat and the heating element)
resistance loads, like a toaster (that is why they are rated acceptable to 125% of breaker capacity)

Jynx is right about any faulty connections continually arcing out creating a fire hazard,
so never leave this press unattended when on and unplug when not in use
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Two of the wires had a faulty terminal crimp, the wire should never be able to be pulled out of a terminal ever. All the terminal crimps were likely done by the same person with the same tool. If it were me i'd buy a good crimp tool (they're cheap) & re-crimp every terminal you can find. Crimp tools are cheap, house fires are not.
Alright I'll go ahead and buy the tool😁
 

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Jynx is right about any faulty connections continually arcing out creating a fire hazard,
so never leave this press unattended when on and unplug when not in use
Yup! Unplug that thing when not in use.

Underthehut I have a Chinese press, too. The controller failed after a year, and I rigged up a manual override that I used until I recently installed an analog thermostat. Good enough for what I use it for, curing screen prints. But now that I am experimenting with sublimation, I will probably get a better press.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
if it turns on and stays on when lifting a wire, then it is a short somewhere
if it does not stay on, then it may be a faulty thermostat

i would try a new switch if after ensuring all connectors are satisfactorily secure mechanically, it still cycles off and on
you can also add a tiny drop of solder on the connectors and wire just below the spade that attaches to the switch

you do need to be careful, which it seems like you are
these are really just baseboard heaters with an electronic thermostat and an electronic timer (unless you have something like a swingman, then it is only an analog thermostat and the heating element)
resistance loads, like a toaster (that is why they are rated acceptable to 125% of breaker capacity)

Jynx is right about any faulty connections continually arcing out creating a fire hazard,
so never leave this press unattended when on and unplug when not in use
Thank you so much for all the help! Thank you EVERYONE! I will continue to mess around with it and i will go ahead and buy that tool as well.
And I am definitely being extra precautious!
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Yup! Unplug that thing when not in use.

Underthehut I have a Chinese press, too. The controller failed after a year, and I rigged up a manual override that I used until I recently installed an analog thermostat. Good enough for what I use it for, curing screen prints. But now that I am experimenting with sublimation, I will probably get a better press.
I'm just doing vinyl transfers now. Sublimation is very nice though! Good luck to you! And thanks for all the help.
 
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