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Hello, I was wondering if it is possible to actually overcure plastisol inks? Reason I'm asking because I'm running a manual ryonet press with the flash cure. I have some problems sometimes with inks washing out, but I have it set up pretty much how it was instructed, which is 6" above the shirt, resting it over the ink for 45-60 secs. normally only the ends are washing out of the image. and my metallic inks i'm having a problem with. like metallic gold without a base coat on a white shirt, the entire image was gone after one wash. Please let me know if it is possible to overcure the ink!

Thanks
Ben
 

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Metallic inks have always been fairly problematic for me. I would think that might even be more so when curing with a flash unit. try the adjustment joe suggested and see of that helps. try to identify if your wash out problem with the metallics and the other regular colors are occurring the same way with the same variables.

sounds like you might be needing 2 different solutions.

hope that helps.
 

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Flash Curing
Plastisol can generally be fully cured with a flash cure unit if the heater is set to the highest temperature and the unit is placed 2-3 inches (5-7.6 cm) over the garment for 20-30 seconds. For curing between colors where only a partial cure is required, the time can be less.
 

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We just did some work with metallic ink and we had to put it through the dryer 3 times in order to get ti to dry. As for you curing unit I agree with that other guy... lower your curing unit to about 3 inches above the shirt. You'll know when it's been on the pallet to long because you'll burn the shirt.
 

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If you say generally only the edges of your design are washing out, then my guess would be that your flash cure unit is a little too small and it's only properly curing the center of the design. Try curing one half and then moving your flash to the other half, possibly allowing the shirt to cool some so you don't scortch it. Move your flash around so that it cures everything. I have that problem sometimes if I don't pay attention, I'll flash a white print, and then go to print the second pass and realize that my flash wasn't completely over the platen and left some spots uncured.
 

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if you apply constant temperature but below 320. would it be still work?
You ink will not cure unless a catalyst is added like for when you print on nylon.

Also every flash is different thus how far away and how long someone else does is not necessaily what you need. Get a tempature gun or strips to see how much time is needed. Also different color of shirts and ink and can affect tempature.
 

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I used to wonder the same thing, found the best way is to get the temp gun(found one on amazon for $12.99) and also test strips. With this you can place a strip inside the shirt under the print, and gun the top, then you get a feel after some time for what temp you need to hit up top and for how long, for it to hit 320 all the way through.
 

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Key is that plastisol needs to reach 320 degrees for one millisecond - then it is cured - best bet is probably to invest in a Temp Gun - that will give you a more accurate reading

^^^Best answer yet.

Its not a matter of how close your flash is to the shirt, or wait till it smokes. It NEEDS TO hit between 315-330*F in order to cure. NO if's and's or but's.

Having a temp gun will make your life much easier.

-Seamus
 

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Plastisol inks WILL cure with or without a catalyst added.
Metallics tend to require longer dwell time because heat is reflected.
There is no definitive height distance and no definitive time for proper cure. Depends on the flash and how hot it gets and other factors.
A temp gun is a start but does not guarantee accurate reading nor optimum cure throughout the ink deposit. It's reading the ambient temp, not the entire ink deposit. The ideal measuring device is a donut probe.
You CAN overcure plastisol. It reaches full cure temp then will re-melt and become brittle or transparent.
The shirt can "smoke" before the ink cures. Especially fabrics with a higher moisture content.
Full cure temp range is just that... a range. Different ink formulations and colors cure at different rates and temps.
Fabric color and make up affects cure rate and temp also.
 

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Just to add a couple of caveats-

A temp gun can be quite useful-- if you remember that it's only measuring the surface. It just hit 320? The top is cured. It's been at 320 for a minute? Your chances are much much better that the entire deposit is cured. Wash testing is the final word anyway, IMO. The customer will not give a crap that you have an IR temp gun, or calibrated your dryer with a fancy doodad if they just bought a couple hundred or thousand bucks worth of washouts.

As far as overcuring--when you hit 350 or so in the full deposit, it will start to look like it's "sinking in" or like Tygeron mentioned, more transparent.
 
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