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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello all,

I’ve been working with our DTG printers for a year now. My company uses Polyprint and G4. For the most part, both types of printers have suited us well for our different needs. However, we have been running into an issue lately with our print quality. When it first comes out, it looks great. By the next day, there are what looks to be sweat rings around all of our sample prints. We use our samples for photoshoots, so this is obviously not ideal. We use Bella + Canvas 3001, 3001 CVC, 3413, 3501, and Gildan 18000. Two opinions I have heard is that the area is too humid and the ink separates (we have moved offices during the year I have been here to a building that tends to be pretty swampy as far as humidity goes, but we are located in southern North America, so it’s generally always some level of humid) or that the fabric content is what’s causing the issue (we’ve used these styles for the whole year I’ve been here and have only started having these issues a few months ago, so I’m not super convinced this is the issue). We use the recommended on-brand ink for both machines and we have been using the G4 Dark Garment Pre-treat and have been pretreating on the lowest setting. What do you all think? Any insight would be very much appreciated. I have attached an image of what our prints have been looking like below.

Product Textile Sleeve Bag Grey
 

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Nothing to do with the printers obviously. All the printers do is spray the ink you are using.

Looks like some type of reaction between the ink fumes and the pretreatment making the affected area absorb moisture from the air.
If this is the case, the stain should go away when you wash the garment.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Nothing to do with the printers obviously. All the printers do is spray the ink you are using.

Looks like some type of reaction between the ink fumes and the pretreatment making the affected area absorb moisture from the air.
If this is the case, the stain should go away when you wash the garment.
We have tried washing the garments, but the sweat reappears after a while.
 

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We have tried washing the garments, but the sweat reappears after a while.
This confirms my suspicion. The area around the print is absorbing moisture.
I'm guessing you are curing with a heat press, because I remember having a similar issue a few years ago with one of my experiments.
When curing with a conveyor dryer the issue disappeared.
Obviously the conveyor dryer is allowing the fumes to escape upwards instead of forcing them through the fabric.

If heat press is the only option you have, then consider trying the following
a) Try a similar color shirt from another brand. Maybe a sizing agent is reacting with the ink fumes.
b) Try another pretreatment brand. Maybe the pretreatment is reacting with the ink fumes.
c) Try a different cover sheet. Maybe residue or the coating from whatever cover sheet you are using is reacting with the ink fumes.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
This confirms my suspicion. The area around the print is absorbing moisture.
I'm guessing you are curing with a heat press, because I remember having a similar issue a few years ago with one of my experiments.
When curing with a conveyor dryer the issue disappeared.
Obviously the conveyor dryer is allowing the fumes to escape upwards instead of forcing them through the fabric.

If heat press is the only option you have, then consider trying the following
a) Try a similar color shirt from another brand. Maybe a sizing agent is reacting with the ink fumes.
b) Try another pretreatment brand. Maybe the pretreatment is reacting with the ink fumes.
c) Try a different cover sheet. Maybe residue or the coating from whatever cover sheet you are using is reacting with the ink fumes.
When we print, we press the shirts, print on them, cure on a conveyor dryer, and then press them again. I thought about it today and realized the issue started around when we got a new pretreat machine (we are using the polyprint pretreater pro now) so I don't know if it is somehow linked to the amount of pretreat that it is spraying out even though we are using it at the lowest setting. We have been lowering the amount of white ink we have been using in addition to using the pretreater on its lowest settings, but now our print quality is suffering and the prints are starting to look a little crusty compared to what we usually print, but those have not sweat (yet).
 

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When we print, we press the shirts, print on them, cure on a conveyor dryer, and then press them again.
That is actually the best way to do it in my opinion.
Try curing the shirt for a bit longer in the conveyor dryer before pressing it and see if that helps.
The final heat pressing should be just a precautionary thing.

so I don't know if it is somehow linked to the amount of pretreat that it is spraying out even though we are using it at the lowest setting. We have been lowering the amount of white ink we have been using in addition to using the pretreater on its lowest settings, but now our print quality is suffering and the prints are starting to look a little crusty compared to what we usually print, but those have not sweat (yet).
More ink needs more time to cure...
Looks like it is the ink fumes after all. Try more time in the conveyor dryer.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
That is actually the best way to do it in my opinion.
Try curing the shirt for a bit longer in the conveyor dryer before pressing it and see if that helps.
The final heat pressing should be just a precautionary thing.


More ink needs more time to cure...
Looks like it is the ink fumes after all. Try more time in the conveyor dryer.
Will do. Thank you for your help and suggestion!
 
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