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Discussion Starter #1
I just thought of this idea. I don't know if it has been done before...

To get a 15" x 15" plasticol transfers printed, that is entirely covered in ink. No design on the transfer, just entirely ink.

Then take the transfers, and put them through the vinyl cutter and cut your design out in reverse. Finally weed away the excess, and tranfer onto t-shirt.

I tested an old plasticol transfer I have sitting around to see if the ink would pull off of the carrier paper. When I peeled it with the exacto knife, the ink came off just like the thermoflex does. It is alot more fragile than thermoflex though.

Would this work? If this works, it would make for a cheaper and higher quality t-shirt!

I mean, 1000 transfers costs like $.50 / sheet. That would be like $.033 an inch compared to thermoflex which is like $.20 an inch.

What do you think?
 

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Hustle101Clothin said:
Sounds good to me, but sounds like it would be a pain to cut the design out for every shirt

Can't you cut it out with a plotter/cutter sign making tool thing?
 

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hey jon, that is a cool idea.

i guess you can run flat out plastisol ink transfers (no designs just ink) in roll format if you set up such equipment/production line, then use low tack adhesive to bond it to the clear carrier material like how the thermoflex rolls come in......this way the transfer sheet (keep) cut out areas would weed like flex etc...

The problem i see is too many steps and you still need to weed.... so it may be more cost effective to run the ink transfer designs. No weeding.

I dont think there is such a thing (Plastisol Ink cutter rolls) on the market...similar vinyls and other may be ????

Here at the factory, we do some strange stuff like it but for 1 of a kind items, samples etc...

You can use the cutter with anything/material etc.. you can low-tack to the carrier rolls.... of course whatever you use you would need the proper blades and that the material it self can be plotter/cut or lazer cut.

Good idea though.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Duracut costs 3.90 per sheet, compared to if you do it yourself, it would cost like $.50 a sheet.

I think I am going to get some transfers made, so I can try this out.

You are right that it would be better to put it on a roll, preferably plastic, but even a roll of parchment paper would work, just like the paper the plasticol transfers are already printed on.

This would be good for the same people that use vinyl, since it would be cheaper and better quality than thermoflex. The quality of thermoflex is questionable. It only lasts for about 20 washes, while plasticol lasts forever.

I think that a regular 45 degree knife blade would work. You would just need to make sure that the blade was barely sticking out, since the plasticol is so thin.
 

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hey JDR, who knows, may be you're on to something.... send me samples when you are ready so i can check it out.....
 

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jdr8271 said:
Duracut costs 3.90 per sheet, compared to if you do it yourself, it would cost like $.50 a sheet.

The quality of thermoflex is questionable. It only lasts for about 20 washes, while plasticol lasts forever.

Hummmm..never heard that one before.
 

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I've already thought of that. The last Inkjet/Lights order I did was probably about the same amount if not less work insofar as cutting them out to remove hand. At the end of day 3. these were 14 hour days I had 100 shirts done. I went this route because I thought I did'nt have time to order plastisol.
I would have been money ahead getting plastisol transfers rush charge printed and next dayed as I've pressed an order this size in under 4 hours using them.
I use duracut to do sales/sample proofs and have some tees that have been washed way over 20 times with no loosening, cracking or fading.
 

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Great enterprising idea! Duracut is just what you are talking about, but yes, it is $3.90 p/sheet. The advantages to this process is an ink feel on the garment, however from a production standpoint you'll have to load the material in sheet by sheet rather than a continous roll. Also, for whatever reason, our Duracut is not recommended for 2 color applications, you might run into that. I'm not real sure, about the durability of Thermoflex, but I've personally washed the Spectra heat transfer vinyl over and over and it outlasts the life of the garment.
 

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I personally use thermoflex plus because I am comfortable with it and the process. This stuff is durable easy to work with and I can get real intricate fonts just perfect. I use it mainly for text designs but it works just as well with any clipart. Regular sign vinyl weeding is sometimes tricky with small fonts and designs. Thermoflex allows me more options with my fonts because of the ease in weeding...you cant rip this stuff and not lose a character....that is cool when doing on the spot customs. Durability....whoever said in twenty washes it will fall off...wrong!!!!!! This stuff is very durable and the finer the line the less hand you feel. If you have access to a plotter I suggest you play with this a bit...for white text on dark shirts I think its perfect.
 

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I've not read about Thermoflex vinyl not holding up. And this is from pros at another board who do lots of uniforms. Perhaps it's "another" vinyl...there's been discussion about the not-so-good-brands. Susan

jdr8271 said:
This would be good for the same people that use vinyl, since it would be cheaper and better quality than thermoflex. The quality of thermoflex is questionable. It only lasts for about 20 washes, while plasticol lasts forever.
 

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Discussion Starter #14 (Edited)
I use thermoflex every day. It is good, but it certianly doesn't hold up forever. I am not trying to downgrade the quality of thermoflex either. Thermoflex is the most practical product on the market at this point. I am certianly not disputing that, as, like I said I use this product every day. It doesnt fall off after 20 washes, but I do notice, especially on intricate designs, that the edges start to peel the more you wash it.

The duracut product is too expensive for me, and is sold in sheets which also makes it less practicle than thermoflex.

I haven't tried spectra beacuse I use a 15" cutter. Id rather not spend my time trimming 4 inches off of 19" the roll of vinyl.

Plasticol is a longer lasting product than vinyl, and also feels better. I don't think that anyone can dispute that. For me, being able to do a one-off shirt with plasticol would improve the quality of my shirts, and it would cost a fraction of the cost (if it works).

I would also just like to point out, that these companies are making a fortune on us, for a very simple product that as it appears, most of us could make ourselves (with the help of a screen printer). I had never though about this before, but the .20/inch price of thermoflex is probably over 5 times what it costs to make it. The .25/inch price of duracut is well over 5 times the cost to make it. Screen printed transfer only cost a few cents if you do them yourself, and are cheap still if you pay someone to make them for you.

I am going to get some of these made for my own business, and I will report back on the quality, and if they even work when I do.
 
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