T-Shirt Forums banner
1 - 15 of 15 Posts

· Registered
Joined
·
22 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I just picked out my heat press and I am on the fence on whether to buy a printer and do a plastisol transfer or to buy a vinyl cutter.

Our main market is going to be kids sports teams.

Can anyone help with the pros and cons of each?
 

· Registered
Joined
·
142 Posts
The best I can say, from my experience is both go well together. If you can only afford a vinyl cutter or a printer, get the cutter first. The reason I say that, is there is so much more you can do with a cutter compared to just a printer.

Also someone will correct me if I am wrong, but a printer will not let you make plastisol transfers. You can print to JPSS and other similar transfer papers. But to make a plastisol transfer you need a screen printer.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
I use vinyl and it works quite well. I sometimes have problems when printing onto pique polo shirts but other than that it's quite effective. The down side is that I can only print spot colours or vector images. I've had to turn away business because some people want photo's printed and images that have a lot of colours in them. I want to buy a printer cutter but the cheapest one I've seen is about £5000 ($8000). Does anyone know if you can get them second hand? I've written a little about the benefits of vinyl printing on my website Custom Clothing
 

· Registered
Joined
·
637 Posts
I agree with Patrick. I have neither and am hoping to rectify soon. The plastisol transfers you can get fairly inexpensively and in numbers. Those numbers will spread out your shipping cost. When you're just doing one or two vinyl transfers from Stahls or IW then most of the time the shipping is the same or more than what you're getting. That cutter could knock out those quick personalization things. I like the plastisol better than vinyl though as far as shirt designing goes. Much rather use it, but until I start doing my own screening I can't justify the cost for personalization.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
22 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Thank you all for your quick reply's, experience from real world people is invaluable.

The only downside that I have seen from printing my own transfers is that there is no such thing as white ink and white backgrounds look great on numbers.

Then again if I am able to print plastisol transfers myself I do not have to cut 2 colors of vinyl (2 color sports numbers). Saves time in weeding, especially if I am doing whole teams in one order, I can print everything on 1 11 x 17 heat transfer, press, and I'm done.

Trying to find the balance of cost vs. time to produce.

I have found a company (link below) that says they have special ink for plastisol transfers to be able to do it at home using a Continuous Ink System. Does anyone have any insight to this?
Continuous Ink System, Refillable Ink Cartridges, Bulk Ink Systems, CISS, CIS
 

· Registered
Joined
·
22 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
You can buy stock number so cheap it is not worth printing your own......

Great advice! That is what I was thinking for the 8" numbers.

The main thing that I am thinking about is the custom logo on front and the name on back. I am thinking ordering the heat transfers online for this now and doing a cost comparison after I do a few runs.

I am trying to keep the cost to customer around $10-$12.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
4,169 Posts

· Registered
Joined
·
22 Posts
Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Your link is for ink jet transfers. Plastisol is printed through a screen with a squeegee. Check youtube for screenprinting and you'll get the idea quicker than I can explain it.
Ahh I got it. I though it was plastisol.

How do ink transfers compare to heat press or screenprinted images? Seems like it would be really easy to print out a jet transfer and press on to a shirt.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
4,169 Posts
Ahh I got it. I though it was plastisol.

How do ink transfers compare to heat press or screenprinted images? Seems like it would be really easy to print out a jet transfer and press on to a shirt.
It is very easy and with the right paper/ink combo, they can last a little while. I've found the paper makes more difference than the ink, my best luck has been with JPSS (jet pro soft stretch); I'm far from an expert though. In general, plastisol can last the lifetime of the shirt while ink jet transfer durability can vary from months to years.
 
1 - 15 of 15 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top