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Hi guys,
After I cure the Plastisol ink ( 1~2 colors )
It feels super rubbery,sticky and looks bit thick, shiny and "cheap".. even after I wash them.
Am I putting too much ink? or Is Plastisol ink suppose to be like that?

I'm looking for somethig that's matte / smooth like garments on the market.
(EX: brands using screen printing method, Antisocialsocialclub, off white etc..)
Even if I get less of rubbery feeling it would be much better
Could you recommend other inks or what I could to to achieve that texture?

(I don't work with water color at all since it fades after couple wash, not vivid.. etc)
 

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Water based inks do not fade. And you can get a vivid bright opaque white for either its own purpose or as a base for colors. Matsui and Green Galaxy and Permaset all have nicely opaque whites (Permaset SuperCover being tops). Any opaque ink, be it Plastisol or waterbased, is going to add some hand feel, but with Permaset Supercover it will be matte and lighter than Plastisol (if printed right). With an opaque waterbased print you can still see the texture of the fabric, whereas Plastisol tends to fill in the valleys and leave more of a sticker-stuck-on-the-shirt look.

As to your prints, what mesh count are you using? Higher mesh count and print/flash/print can get you to a lighter weight Plastisol print.
 

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"Rubbery, sticky, and thick" can have a couple of different causes that usually snowball into that combination

First and foremost, lets talk Thick.

Thick prints are usually caused by low mesh counts. 110 mesh seems to be an industry favorite and go-to for general use. However, unless I am specifically trying to get a thick print, or lay down a solid thinned white base, 160 mesh is the lowest count that I use in daily work. Do keep in mind that this can and will increase the number of hits you need in certain situations.

Another common issue that new printers run into is hitting the same color too many times. I've seen printers that will hit-flash-hit-flash-hit-flash-hit-flash-hit until there is absolutely no semblance of fabric left to the print. I can not state this firmly enough: If you need absolute solid coverage of the underlying fabric color and texture, you NEED to use an underbase.

While there are several other reasons that you have thick prints, I'm trying to keep things simple and avoid dumping an overwhelming amount of information on you. Last thing to mention before we move on: If you find yourself wanting to hit any single color more than twice, talk to your supplier about HO (High Opaque) and SO (Super Opaque) inks. I'm not going to go into detail here, but simply put, they provide a more solid coverage with the same amount of ink.

On to Rubbery and Sticky.

First off, plastisol is basically a very soft PVC... Yeah, like your plumbing... Therefore, plastisol is always going to be rubbery. We simply take steps to make the plastisol less rubbery, such as mixing ink before use, using soft hand base/additive, keeping prints as thin as possible, adding an underbase when needed to reduce number of hits, etc.

That being said, sticky is a different story. When sticky gets added to the mix, it usually means that you have a flash and/or cure problem. That problem is almost always too much heat, and the conveyor is usually the culprit. You can test this rather easily if your prints feel sticky when they come off the conveyor: After your final hit, flash the shirt instead of moving it to the conveyor. Leave it under long enough so that the ink doesn't blur or migrate when you rub it with your finger (Be careful of the platen temperature). Now lift the shirt off the platen and feel of the print. Chances are that it doesn't feel sticky...

If this is the case, turn the heat on your conveyor down a bit and use test shirts until you get your desired results. Make sure to give time after turning down the heat, before printing another shirt for the heat in the conveyor head to dissipate and level out. If you don't have a way to accurately measure your temperature or if you don't know your ink's cure temperature, I would recommend aggressively and thoroughly hand washing that last test shirt to ensure it is fully cured before swapping to production shirts.

One final note.

Experiment & enjoy yourself... Trial and error is one of the best learning tools you have at your disposal :)
 
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