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Discussion Starter #1
Hi all!

Is Photoshop really good enough for creating screen-print designs? I've been trying to learn vector graphics/illustrator for some time now, it's not really working out for me though and frankly, I hate working with Illustrator. I have 8 prints that would be suitable for screen-printing, most are not more than three colors. So my question is, if I use the Cut-out function in Photshop + using my drawing tablet for details, I am quite good with Photoshop too, would that be acceptable for screen-printing? Would there be a considerable loss in quality? I mean I want those crisp lines that you get with vector graphics but could you tell which shirt was created in Illustrator or Photoshop in the end?

/
Dan
 

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You can use photoshop for screen printing with no problem. However, you need to watch the resolution. If you create artwork at a low resolution it will cause problems with making stencils. You want to create them pretty high, probably around 300 dpi or so. With vector you don't have to worry about this.

You may want to try Corel Draw, it's much easier to work with than Illustrator, I've used both for years and prefer Colel Draw.
 

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Well in the end it depends on the type of design you're making. Whether you want crisp lines or not. Photoshop will be fine quality wise as long as you do it actual size, CMYK, and 300dpi. With my designs, I use a mix of both( I imagine one day when Illustrator and Photoshop will be one program). I donno if i'd recommend the cutout filter for vector designs, you're better off using the pen tool and vectorizing it yourself. But then in the end, it all depends on what you want your design to look like.
 

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With any software, it is only as good as the designer. I personally use Jasc Paint Shop Pro because I think Adobe Photoshop is way over kill for a lot of things. I think it's more than good enough for shirt printing, if you're familiar with the software :)
 

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Remember though that you need to change the DPI/resolution *before* you create the image.

If you try changing it afterwards you will just "stretch" the existing pixels which will just make the design look blurry when enlarged.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Thanks for all the advice. How about separating colors in Photoshop? Is that an easy process too? I went to the local screen-printer and I didn't get any wiser, maybe it was because the guy that worked with graphics wasn't there at the time. But anyway, they said that graphics for screenprinting has to be vectorgraphics in order to separate the colors, is that true?
I'd love to show my t-shirt designs to someone on the forum, would be nice with some feedback from someone who works with graphics, I'm afraid one or two of my designs might be too "pixelish", any volunteers?
 

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You may want to look at these Tutorials...Maybe, no offense, the "Newbie," Tut will be what you need. I certainly did/do need it.

You may want to look at these Tutorials...Maybe, no offense, the "Newbie," Tut will be what you need. I certainly did/do need it.

free download motorsportsillustrated.com/vol2_mini.zip you will have some sample files that you can experiment for yourself with
 

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devil said:
Thanks for all the advice. How about separating colors in Photoshop? Is that an easy process too? I went to the local screen-printer and I didn't get any wiser, maybe it was because the guy that worked with graphics wasn't there at the time. But anyway, they said that graphics for screenprinting has to be vectorgraphics in order to separate the colors, is that true?
I'd love to show my t-shirt designs to someone on the forum, would be nice with some feedback from someone who works with graphics, I'm afraid one or two of my designs might be too "pixelish", any volunteers?
It sounds like you really should become friends with Illustrator. It's a great program that most people love if they know how to use it. Accurate color seperations in Photoshop is near impossible as it's a raster-based program and is meant to be used for... photos.
 

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CMYK huh? Thats weird that a printer would want that unless it was a mulitcolored design.

Anyway, I still highly recommend vector art unless its impossible to create what you're looking for. You don't need all that resolution mess. And since 1-3 color designs are usually more popular now it'll keep costs down.
 
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