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I would like to print a few one color hot peel transfers for a local organization but I only have a flash dryer. I read the article by Mark Goodridge "Printing Plastisol Transfers" and he suggests a controlled heat source as opposed to a flash dryer due to the fluctuating temperature changes. I wanted to know if anyone has printed transfers using permaflex inks which is supposed to be similar to plastisol but can be air dryed. If so how does the finished product compare to the finished product of a plastisol transfer? If not and you have successfully used a flash dryer how did you control the temperature.

Thanks,
veedub3
 

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Because permaflex is completely cured after 12 hours of air-drying, it would not be suitable for transfers. Plastisol transfers work because the ink is not completely cured until it is applied with a heat press at a certain temperature. Permaflex does not require heat, and in fact, heat doesn't even have an affect on it.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks splathead.

Has anyone had success in gelling plastisol transfers with a flash dryer? If so how did you control the temperature?

Veedub3
 

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Thanks splathead.

Has anyone had success in gelling plastisol transfers with a flash dryer? If so how did you control the temperature?

Veedub3
Absolutely, that's what we use. It is going to depend on your dryer/wattage and your ink, so you will need to experiment. We place the transfers 6 inches from the heating element for 15 seconds.

A non draft (no fans, no open windows, no open garage doors etc.) helps a great deal to control fluctuations.
 
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