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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all

So ive been researching and researching and researching now im at the stage where I want to start getting all my ideas and images together.

Dont have photshop/illustrator or corel yet but I did download Gimp which is supposed to be very similar to photoshop and best of all its free! :)

I am trying to teach myself how to use the software and searching online for as many tips and tricks that I can.

Heres the logo I have designed and tried to go for a Shiny gold effect.

Would just like to get some opinions on it??

Thanx guys

Glen
 

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I like it, nice highlighting. The compass is a little busy. You may want to consider removing some of the ribs and highlighting from it. Also, the compass looks oblong rather than circular.
 

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Get rid of drop shadow on just the compass or all of it?
I'd say all of it but it's up to you.

Try printing it out on a business card (in your case I'd make it left-aligned and about 75% of the height of the card, so print it out at about a height of 1.5-1.75") and see how legible it is. The guy above me had some good suggestions on how to make the drop shadow better.

While you're playing with free programs, try Inkscape too!
 

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Really nice work! I agree about 86'ing the drop shadow, though; it doesn't really need it. As for some friendly nitpicking:

The placement of the words "North" and "South" make them difficult to read. When you put type at such a large angle (let alone two words at very different angles) it can cause your audience to be confused. Also, the position you have them in leaves a large amount of negative space on the right hand side and an arrowhead on the left. This would look great on something large, like a t-shirt, but if you ever put this on something smaller like a business card it may be difficult to manage your visual hierarchy. I wouldn't scrap this idea entirely, just retool it a bit to find a happy medium. Hope this helps!
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Good idea, Will print it out bus card size and see what it looks like.

Maybe having the word 'North' horizontal and 'South' vertically through it may be easier to read, will try a version of it like this too I think
 

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Sounds like a good idea. I'd make up a little proof sheet with various thumbnails that try different combinations out (coloring, alignment, effects, etc.). The big thing they taught me in school was that a logo should look great in color or black and white, the size of a thumbnail or the size of a building. Also keep in mind that you may at some point need to create a vector version of this logo for various purposes. Good luck!
 

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Nice concept but needs a bit more refinement. By that I mean less is more. Some of the comments are right on target regarding drop shadows, black and white, etc.

Successful branding and logos must be strong at a reasonably quick glance. Drop shadows and chrome textures are all wowie zowie but can take too much away from your name, word or symbol themselves. Effective logos can be clever and informative yet compact and basic, all at the same time. Begin simple and work from there but police your brain. In this case, not start over but back it up a bit.

When designing, always remember that your logo will be reproduced at many different sizes on numerous different substrates. What looks great on the computer screen may cause printing problems down the road. You could have a dazzler for the office stationary and other versions for specific applications but it's way more practical and professional to keep things streamlined from the beginning.
 

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Nice concept but needs a bit more refinement. By that I mean less is more. Some of the comments are right on target regarding drop shadows, black and white, etc.

Successful branding and logos must be strong at a reasonably quick glance. Drop shadows and chrome textures are all wowie zowie but can take too much away from your name, word or symbol themselves. Effective logos can be clever and informative yet compact and basic, all at the same time. Begin simple and work from there but police your brain. In this case, not start over but back it up a bit.

When designing, always remember that your logo will be reproduced at many different sizes on numerous different substrates. What looks great on the computer screen may cause printing problems down the road. You could have a dazzler for the office stationary and other versions for specific applications but it's way more practical and professional to keep things streamlined from the beginning.
Couldn't have said it better myself! :D
 

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Steven has a great point. Always consider how you may possibly use your logo in the future. If you ever want to embroider your logo say maybe on polo shirts to wear at a trade show or on a cap it may not work. I have come up with many designs I really liked but they just wouldn't work with a wide variety of mediums.
 
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