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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all! Long time lurker, first time poster.

I'm thinking of buying a used HIX B-250D, as my first heat press. I've never owned a heat press and don't have direct experience with them.

I'm wondering if the used HIX is worth my time and investment? Its going for $470 Australian, or $345 in US dollars. If I'm buying a new press for that amount, it would be a low-end Chinese model. Buying a new HIX B-250 is around $1400 here in Australia.

The machine is 10 years old, but is being sold by the original owner, who says it hasn't been used much in that time.

What do you think? Is this a good choice for a first timer, or would you pass on it? If I go to inspect the press, what should I look for?

Thanks very much for any suggestions, ideas or opinions (y)(y)

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it looks to be in really good shape
my cap press is over 25 years old and still runs like a champ (lancer brand in canada)
my hix heat press is also over 25 years old and still runs like a champ,
and it looks like parts are available from hix for for this cap press
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks very much, this is all useful info. I'm glad to hear that older HLX machines hold up well over the years, and have spare parts available. I have an infrared thermometer and will take it along when I go to inspect.
 

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don't be surprised if the readings are not what the hat press is set to,
the infrared will not read accurately against the heat plate (info link and emissivity tables link)

but you can gauge precision of temp across the heat plate with an infrared gun,
or simply bring a digital kitchen meat thermometer (or paper temp strips from a furnace supply store)
this type of contact reading is more accurate
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Ok I see, so even heat across the plate is more important than overall accuracy. That makes perfect sense, thanks a lot for the info.

Everyone is really helpful in this group, its likely I'll be spending more time here as I get deeper into this.

Since you guys have been so willing to share advice and opinions, could you take a quick glance at the following photos? The same person selling the hat press also has a full size HIX heat press, which I'm also interested in buying. Do you see anything in the photos that would concern you, anything I should pay attention to before buying? I know its missing one of the mats, which is OK. The top of the heating element section looks to have some surface damage {or dust?}, is that something to be concerned about?

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you definitely will want paper temp strips for the heat press before buying
place a strip near each of the corners, then one in between these, and a couple more more around the center

check the pressure knob for both low and high pressure
clamp it down with high pressure and a piece of paper sticking out a few inches
then try to remove the paper

bring a flat straight edge with you (2' level) and check the upper platen for any cupping
front to back and side to side, all over the platen

that dual press will speed things up considerably once you get the rhythm/pattern going
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thanks so much, Into the T.

Unfortunately paper temp test strips don't seem to exist Down Under. I do have an infrared thermometer, and thinking I should at least buy a teflon blanket to try this method:

If the upper platen has any cupping whatsoever, I'm assuming the press is toast, and I shouldn't bother with it?

Thanks again for your help, eveyone, I really appreciate that you're answering my noob questions. These presses are 3 hours drive away from my location, so its a bit of a committment to go look at them in person. Need to make sure I know what to look for, before taking that step. Its not really feasible to make multiple trips, so I'd be making a decision there and then.
 

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It’s not so much about cupping (since the bottom platen is rubber) as it is about uneven heating. Hot/cold spots will drive you nuts. Hix are good machines & I think you can buy replacement parts if the temp goes bad. Cheap Chinese press, you’re outta luck. And yes, buy a new Teflon top cover & save yourself a lot of aggravation.
 

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Thanks so much, Into the T.

Unfortunately paper temp test strips don't seem to exist Down Under. I do have an infrared thermometer, and thinking I should at least buy a teflon blanket to try this method:

If the upper platen has any cupping whatsoever, I'm assuming the press is toast, and I shouldn't bother with it?

Thanks again for your help, eveyone, I really appreciate that you're answering my noob questions. These presses are 3 hours drive away from my location, so its a bit of a committment to go look at them in person. Need to make sure I know what to look for, before taking that step. Its not really feasible to make multiple trips, so I'd be making a decision there and then.
that is a great idea for checking temps

the problem with cupping is you always have to use pillows, this adds to the time each tee takes
it's not insurmountable, but is something to consider
 
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