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Hi everyone.

I’m choosing a dtf printer and have a couple of questions about it. Firstly I’m between oki with white toner and audley with 4 heads. The second has a big size and additional powder machine that produces smog which is a small problem. Actually I can‘t understand the purpose of the powder machine and why oki printer doesn’t has it. And finally oki is x2 more fast then Audley. Oki prints A4 color 5ppm. That equals 187 square meters per hour. And Audley produces 75m2/h. But Audley price is x2 less and this is big plus. Both use flex I suppose. So, what to choose?
 

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It's like you're trying to compare one brand of electric car to another brand of gas engine car. Apple to orange. Forget about brands and models until you figure out whether you're going DTF or White Tone Laser. Personally, I don't like Audley for a variety of reasons I don't want to go into, but DTF is much better than WTL, IMHO
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
It's like you're trying to compare one brand of electric car to another brand of gas engine car. Apple to orange. Forget about brands and models until you figure out whether you're going DTF or White Tone Laser. Personally, I don't like Audley for a variety of reasons I don't want to go into, but DTF is much better than WTL, IMHO
Sorry, but I thought they are DTF both. They both print on DTF paper, don’t it?
 

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You should do a bit more research before buying anything. DTG is inkjet printing directly on a garment. DTF is inket printed on a film transfer that is pressed onto the garment. The Oki uses toner, which is a very different technology. In general, it will not give you results as good as a inkjet printer for garments. Get samples made with all 3 methods. You can purchase finished shirts from the Oki and DTG printers. For DTF, you can either purchase a finished shirt or purchase the transfers and press them yourself. Many DTF vendors will send you free samples to test.
 

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Sorry, but I thought they are DTF both. They both print on DTF paper, don’t it?
DTF is an idiotic term (transfers are not direct printing).
Both methods print transfers on film, but not the same type of film.
The big difference between the two transfer methods you mentioned is that one is inkjet and the other laser toner.

The most important points I’ve found: DTF requires a LOT of maintenance in compare with WTL, but the washability/durability of WTL is poor.
This is correct.
Inkjet in this particular case is better and cheaper, but the printer does require maintenance.

From another side I’d like to mention DTG also. What important points does it have in compare with DTF and DTL?
DTG prints directly to the garment. No transfer involved.
Much better in terms of look and feel, but very difficult to learn and get it right.
A small mistake can easily cost $5 to $10 (shirt + ink).
 

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From another side I’d like to mention DTG also. What important points does it have in compare with DTF and DTL?
DTG prints directly to the garment. No transfer involved.
Much better in terms of look and feel, but very difficult to learn and get it right.
A small mistake can easily cost $5 to $10 (shirt + ink).
Not to mention the much higher cost of DTG equipment and DTG does not have the inventory convenience, flexibility, and potential to sell transfers that DTF allows.

As I see it, the only advantage to WTL is very low maintenance (DTG, DTF very high) but enough negatives (mostly quality) that IMHO: WTL is a dud.
 

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The better term for DTF is digital to film. Please do not call anything coming out of a toner printer DTF. It is a very different process. DTF was coined as the term for producing a transfer on a coated film substrate using water based ink.
 

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Not to mention the much higher cost of DTG equipment and DTG does not have the inventory convenience, flexibility, and potential to sell transfers that DTF allows.
Well... DTG printers can print DTF too, BUT selling transfers involves shipping costs, so you may as well ship the shirt itself.
The profit margins are bigger on shirts, especially if you can get them at real wholesale prices.
DTG has its positives, but white ink is definitely a big pain in the butt. Personally I only DTG CMYK.

As I see it, the only advantage to WTL is very low maintenance (DTG, DTF very high) but enough negatives (mostly quality) that IMHO: WTL is a dud.
I don't like laser transfers on garments either, but I know people making good money with white toner printing.
T-shirts are not the only things you can make money printing.
My sister has a Ricoh C7100X and it's definitely a moneymaker.

The better term for DTF is digital to film. Please do not call anything coming out of a toner printer DTF.
Err... technically toner transfers are also "digital to film".

DTF was coined as the term for producing a transfer on a coated film substrate using water based ink.
DTF "Direct to Fabric" is much older. That's Inkjet of sheets of fabrics.
The reason people started using it for the transfers, is because its sounds similar to DTG.
It's a common practice unfortunately, and it does confuse people.
 

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Well... DTG printers can print DTF too, ...
Yes, DTG machine can do DTF, but you wouldn't buy a $20k machine to do the job of a $7k machine (or $2k in my case for a commercial machine). And if you have a DTF machine, you may find that you can get by doing the same types of jobs as DTG machines without making that investment. Already owning a DTG machine is different than choosing between one or the other.
...BUT selling transfers involves shipping costs, so you may as well ship the shirt itself.
The profit margins are bigger on shirts, especially if you can get them at real wholesale prices.
DTG has its positives, but white ink is definitely a big pain in the butt. Personally I only DTG CMYK.
first shipping transfers is much cheaper than shipping apparel.

When a client asks to buy DTF prints, they have their reasons. Typically they are also buying apparel wholesale, have a heat press (and often do HTV and/or screen printing, but don't have DTG or DTF equipment).

They may want to have transfers ready for future orders that they do not yet know the size, color or even style of apparel that it is going on. That's what I was referring to earlier with "inventory convenience and flexibiilty", as opposed to DTG.

When they ask if you sell DTF It's generally a yes or no question, not a great opportunity to pitch them on finished apparel at higher margins.
I don't like laser transfers on garments either, but I know people making good money with white toner printing.
T-shirts are not the only things you can make money printing.
My sister has a Ricoh C7100X and it's definitely a moneymaker.
Yes, WTL has better utility and opportunity for substrates other than apparel.
 

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Yes, DTG machine can do DTF, but you wouldn't buy a $20k machine to do the job of a $7k machine (or $2k in my case for a commercial machine).
a) Why not?
b) Not all DTG printers don't cost $20,000.
c) Another thing DTG printers can do is printing hybrid (DTG over screen-printed base).

When a client asks to buy DTF prints, they have their reasons.
If the client asks for DTF, then OK.
Unfortunately, not everybody likes how DTF looks and feels.
 

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but you wouldn't buy a $20k machine to do the job of a $7k machine
a) Why not?
Well, I guess that's just a business decision that each business needs to make.
Unfortunately, not everybody likes how DTF looks and feels.
OK, but in many cases measures can be taken to improve the DTF hand - if done correctly (see post #13 in that same thread).
 

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OK, but in many cases measures can be taken to improve the DTF hand
Optimizing is always good, but customers are too picky these days.
Would you pay $20 for a DTF shirt at the shop? I wouldn't.

For me personally, even white ink DTG is not good enough.
There is a video on YouTube demonstrating in detail what I've been saying for years.

DTG and DTF (direct to fabric) in CMYK mode however, has been a game changer for the industry.
Anyway... I'm getting off topic here.
 

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Absolutely I would, and I'd bet (in USD) the overwhelming majority of consumers either could not tell the difference (when done correctly)
Nah... unless you are a big brand like Nike or Adidas, this isn't true.
Big brands can sell vinyl printed tees for $20 or even $80, because many people like wearing big brands.
Small unknown brands cannot do this.

Also how are you going to compete with shirts like this, and how are you going to print it in DTF?
Sleeve Gesture Font Screenshot Brand
Font Beard Poster Art Illustration

This is not easy to do properly in DTG either, but it is possible.
 

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Nah... unless you are a big brand like Nike or Adidas, this isn't true.
Big brands can sell vinyl printed tees for $20 or even $80, because many people like wearing big brands.
Small unknown brands cannot do this.
I think we have firmly transcended into the land of opinion.
Also how are you going to compete with shirts like this, and how are you going to print it in DTF?
Admittedly I don't know DTG, so IDK, but what makes you think if you can get it flat on a DTG platen that I couldn't get it flat on a heat press? Or are you trying to say something else about the difference in quality?
 

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Admittedly I don't know DTG, so IDK, but what makes you think if you can get it flat on a DTG platen that I couldn't get it flat on a heat press?
If you think you can do it in DTF, then OK.
I've tried both in DTF and toner transfers. The feathered edges don't come out right.
 
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