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So i asked in another post, if overlapping plastisol inks was ok. The general reply was, yes, its totally fine.
My new question is, why would anyone ever make an image say, with a small square fitting into a large square, without making the large square, a little bit smaller than the small square. I.e a small portion of the inside of the large square, being overlapped by the small square.
I believe this is called trapping, and it seems to make sense.
I am just wondering the pros and cons of using this method, with plastisol inks.
{I wouldnt be surprised if this is confusing to some, and i aplologize in advance! sorry for my explination!}
thanks youse guys
 

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ffokazak said:
So i asked in another post, if overlapping plastisol inks was ok. The general reply was, yes, its totally fine.
My new question is, why would anyone ever make an image say, with a small square fitting into a large square, without making the large square, a little bit smaller than the small square. I.e a small portion of the inside of the large square, being overlapped by the small square.
I believe this is called trapping, and it seems to make sense.
I am just wondering the pros and cons of using this method, with plastisol inks.
{I wouldnt be surprised if this is confusing to some, and i aplologize in advance! sorry for my explination!}
thanks youse guys

Trapping is a band-aid for poor artwork and or a sloppy press or loose screens mesh.

Any professional printer would never trap or over pint another color other than an under base unless it was absolutely necessary.


The pro’s of using that method is you can get away with sloppy work however your print hand will suffer.


The con’s are now you have to flash every color to keep from mudding and losing edge definition.

There is more to it than that but there is the short version
 
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