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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
creating iron on transfers for embroider and crafts?

I was thinking today (dangerous I know...) but I was, and it occurred to me that one thing I haven't seen, but would be FANTASTIC for crafters, embroiderers, wood workers, etc...

IS there already? an ink cartridge that would print to plain paper, but leave a transfer pattern? I remember seeing packs of iron on embroidery designs (and for wood, and other stuff) you would just choose the design, flip it over, iron it and it would transfer to the fabric to follow as an embroidery pattern. (or wood for chip carving or wood burning...) It would be a single color outline (thoug I suppose full color could be nice too) and it would be great to just pop in the cartridge to the inkjet when you wanted to print out a clip art or graphic to transfer. then the regular cartridge goes back in (or if you do a lot, you could dedicate a printer to it). So, unlike "transfers" that print to paper to transfer a full finished design, this would be only the line drawing-- I used to have a pencil that I used to trace outlines on tracing paper and then iron them onto fabric, but hitting PRINT, would be so much faster and repeatable.

ANyone know if that's possible? if it's already done and where to get it?
thanks
 

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Why not just use the same transfer paper you use to print finished designs print the outlines? Or am i missing something?

What is your use for the outline once it's on the shirt? The scrapbook market has several rub on transfer papers, but it's more expensive than a shirt iron on transfer.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
not sure how to explain the result. but the t shirt transfer paper isn't what is wanted or needed here. The outline, or pattern is a transfer to then later embroider but not the end product.

Amazon.com: Celtic Iron-on Transfer Patterns (Iron-On Transfers) (9780486260594): Courtney Davis: Books

here's an example of the kind of transfer I am talking about... we used to (and still do) use tracing paper and a heat transfer pencil to trace a drawing and then iron it on to the object as a pattern to follow. I just figure, somewhere out there there has to be someone smart enough to make it in a computer applicable version in an inkjet or laser cartridge version. It's always been traced on plain paper (tracing paper) and then the iron (or heat press) transfers the lines to the fabric.

hope that makes it a bit more clear.
djl
 
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