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hi guys,
I recently bought 100 Next Level CVC v neck t shirts in a turquoise color that are a 60/40 cotton poly. I took them to a dyehouse where I asked for them to enzyme dye the shirt so it has a burn out type of look. I have seen them do this wash before so I know they are familiar with the process.

The difference though, is they usually receive the shirts in a 50/50 cotton poly in white, they dye the shirt there, then they enzyme wash it out to finalize the look.

The shirts I brought to them were already pre-dyed turquoise, so I asked them to simply enzyme wash the shirt to give it the same burn out look.

I received the shirts back, and when I threw them in my wash, apparently the color is still bleeding off of the shirt. The bleeding is so bad, I had to go back and vacuum out the turquoise dust particles left over in my dryer.

My question is, are these shirts not sellable at this point since the color continues to come off the shirt (to the point where taking the shirt off of you leaves turquoise dye on you) or is there a way to still lock in the color with some type of clear coat like silicone? I will also be putting graphics on the t shirts so I must stay uner 10% silicone.

I will post pics soon.

Thanks for any advice in advance!
 

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I definitely wouldn't sell anything that's leaving a dye on a customer. The money short term isn't worth the bad rep you would get long term. Here's a couple articles I found that might help you out.

The Best Way to Lock in Fabric Dye Color | eHow.com

FAQ: Is there any way to "set" dye in purchased clothing?

Personally I would just call the company you're talking about. They probably know what's going on certainly more than my quick Google search did. I even tried to search neutralizing the enzyme dye, but came up with nothing. I did (briefly) read about that dye they used, and is it possible they didn't know it wasn't a 50/50 shirt? The info I saw on it seemed to suggest it's a bit of a science and needs to be exact. Just a thought, I don't know much about this... :( Hope I helped a little.
 

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Dyes are chemicals. They react. We have a dye house in town (amazing huh?) and we sent a few rolls of a base good for a custom tablecloth color. I think they kinda need a blank slate, as whatever dyes were used previously may react poorly to the new procedure.

We do re-dye all our faded tablecloths to black, but it still works best on white, with dyestipping occuring as we wash on most other colors.
 
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