T-Shirt Forums banner
1 - 19 of 19 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
17 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I was told that heat transfers are better with macs, but are way expensive. Can someone offer advise on an affordable computer that work well with graphics and a budget. Thanks for all the help!:D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,984 Posts
Any computer should be able to make graphics. The issue isn't the computer, it's the software you use. I use coreldraw, others use adobe illustrator and photoshop. Most of us use Epson printers. The printer is important too.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
677 Posts
You might be surprised to see how basic (and cheap) a computer you can use for your needs. Mainly, you want it to be able to handle the software you choose. Any computer or laptopoff the shelf at Best Buy should work well for you.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
775 Posts
I was told that heat transfers are better with macs, but are way expensive. Can someone offer advise on an affordable computer that work well with graphics and a budget. Thanks for all the help!:D
If you've got the dough to spend, by all means get a MAC. But if you don't, as another member has already alluded to, basic computers work fine, especially for t-shirt design. Now if you said you were about to open a music recording studio and needed a good DAW (digital audio workstation), or start video editing with an NLE station or publishing a massive novel; magazine; or manuscript, a MAC (with the right software) is probably a better choice. But for graphics design, image editing, t-shirt transfers and the like, save your money for the software. PC's cost considerably less than MACS and are more than capable of running AI, PS and Corel (the Big 3 in t-shirtville). Also remember, the pc and software are only 2 pieces of the puzzle. The printer is another important piece. Then there is a cutter and heat press. Yea, better save your money!!! Good luck.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
775 Posts
I've used both over the years, recently switched over to all Mac. I love it and yes, it was WAY more expensive than a PC.

If you're planning on using COREL DRAW, it is not Mac compatible, so that may be something to consider, too.
Yea, you gotta want a MAC. That said, you have usually done enough research to know what software concessions will need to be made prior to purchase. I have owned a computer shop since 1991, we work on both. We see about 20 to 1 PCs to MACs. (use to be 40+ to 1 before Apple dumped MOTOROLA) I use to tell my mac customers "If it weren't for PC's and Windows, I'd starve to death" :)

CalhTech>
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
677 Posts
My last computer was a Mac. You won't get any better results with it and if, like me, you have to use other software, you might find that they're not Mac-compatible and Fusion/Parallels just makes your life more difficult.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
775 Posts
My last computer was a Mac. You won't get any better results with it and if, like me, you have to use other software, you might find that they're not Mac-compatible and Fusion/Parallels just makes your life more difficult.
Yea, that's what we are constantly running in to. "This is not compatible that's not compatible", etc. The biggest thing they have going for them is they get fewer viruses and malware. They are NOT exempt as many might say or think, its just not true. I don't own one but I work on them (gotta eat ya know). :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
I know this is a bit late of a reply but we'll blame the forum's newsletter email for that, lol.

It sickens me that mac fanboy madness is so extreme that someone would actually be so specific as to say macs were better for heat transfers. I would understand if there was a miracle app available on mac only to streamline and automate the process of printing heat transfers (as if such an app is necessary, it's simply a matter of having a sensible printer driver), but as previously stated, most of the time software will be unavailable on a mac vs. a pc, simply based on the sheer number of titles made for pc only.

I had used apple IIs and then macs before ever using a pc, even emulated them on the amiga. I worked on macs in a full-time digital prepress job in the early 90s and we had a pc trying to run desktop publishing, miserably so. Back then, using anything besides a mac was foolish if it was even an option. But today microsoft owns the market and no "I'm a mac and I'm a pc" commercial will change that (although continuing on the stupid trend of windows 8 certainly may, lol). Any must-have image editing/printing software is almost always available on both platforms. If you choose mac, do it because you want a mac, not because someone tells you it's better for certain things. The rest of us are doing fine without Final Cut, Logic, and Garage Band. :p

Having said that I agree as above that a cheap pc is fine for t-shirt graphics, even a $300 modern laptop will do in a pinch. If you have more specific questions about software and the hardware requirements associated, those are better suited to ask here, as they are less likely to cause the thread to mutate into a mac vs. pc war. :rolleyes:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
What model Epson do you recommend. How much are they?

Thanks
I personally use an Epson Workforce WF-7510 and print to JetPro SS transfers. It has an 11x17 auto-feed scanner, fax, wifi, card reader, and prints up to 13x19. The Workforce series uses pigment inks which are preferred for transfer printing since they are more resistant to bleeding and fading than dye inks. The print quality is essentially the same on the different models, so choose one based on the print size and features you require. They are quite affordable especially when on sale. Once pressed, your transfer may have a greenish tint when using genuine Epson cartridges unless you turn down the yellow output in the driver. I installed a continuous ink system and bought off-brand inks on ebay and no longer have this problem, and the cost savings is tremendous.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
24 Posts
I use an Epson workforce 7010 [which they do not make any more] a ciss system, pigment ink, that was all bought off of e-bay. Just make sure that the ink you use is pigment ink. Dye ink will fade on you. I print my own transfers and have some that have been washed as much as 50 times in 6 month period and have not faded at all.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
307 Posts
I was told that heat transfers are better with macs, but are way expensive. Can someone offer advise on an affordable computer that work well with graphics and a budget. Thanks for all the help!:D
I've used Macs, Dell, HP and (once upon a time) Gateway. I had problems with all of them trying to run Adobe Illustrator. I got an Asus and it works great! Make sure you get a fast computer with a lot of memory if you want to run A.I. or Corel. I also have Corel Paint on it and it works well. Don't waste your money on a cheap computer. A Mac will work, but so will a good Asus. I paid about $900.00 for mine. Monitor was separate. Good luck!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,770 Posts
Computers are disposable. We get the Lenovos from Office Depot and they deliver for free.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
553 Posts
When dealing with graphics, it's not much the 'computer' but the video card you're using. Of course having a quad-core (or higher) will run graphic tasks faster than dual-core but it's the task you're doing that'll determine if your card can handle it. Also, have 4GB of ram at the least.

If your video card can't handle certain functions, it can overheat and shut down your computer. So make sure you don't have a cheap low-profile video card or you 'could' run into trouble later. My low-profile card ($50) did fine for about 3 months, then started overheating when doing tasks that lasted longer than 2 minutes (converting jpg's to vector or resizing an image 400% using Perfect Resize). I use these programs a lot.

I have 3 computers in my home office; one has an integrated video card, one has a cheap low-profile video card and the other has an expensive nVidia Geforce 8800 GTS (5 years old now but still powerful).

The integrated video crashes and restarts my computer, within 10 seconds, when using Vector Magic. Also when using Perfect Resize plugin in Photoshop CS5. -- The low-profile video card crashes and restarts my computer, within 1 minute, when using Vector Magic. Also when using Perfect Resize. -- The high-end video card runs just fine when using anything.

Vector Magic and Perfect Resize puts strain on your video card and depending on how much your rendering the graphic, a cheap video may or may not make it to the end of its task.

If you don't use these two programs and you're only editing or consolidating graphics into one, then you should be ok, even with integrated video.

Hope this helps some.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
When dealing with graphics, it's not much the 'computer' but the video card you're using./QUOTE]

Not really, unless you need hardware acceleration for certain functions, such as 3D and video real-time rendering and fast zooming in photoshop. The majority of computations in most 2D programs are handled by the CPU, not the GPU, although more and more OpenGL, OpenCL, and CUDA (nvidia cards only) enabled processing is being implemented within apps.

If you are experiencing GPU overheating in those apps you mentioned, see if you can disable hardware acceleration within the app, or else in windows. This will put all the work on the CPU, as low grade GPUs don't provide any acceleration worth mentioning anyway. The $50 add-in card either has no active cooling or is not adequate for the card, as is often the case for cards in that price range. Ideally though, anyone serious about graphics, video, and/or gaming needs to invest in a decent video card or laptop w/adequate acceleration.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13 Posts
For a good inexpensive mac - go with a minimac start at $599 - they use to be $400 back in the day, but i have one from about 10 years ago & still do graphics the thing never dies. I haven't turned that mini mac off except a few power outages, the whole time I've owned it. I love it & would tell anyone to get one for a inexpensive mac. I own a few macs too & that little computer is the best computer I have ever owned.
 
1 - 19 of 19 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top