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Hey everybody! I'm Jason,

I do not know if I am starting a t-shirt company or just going down another endless path in a quest for the golden unicorn, but I am building a simple press, have a sign shop making me some screens, designing some shirts and I would love some advice.

I want to use a quality BLACK shirt with a WHITE ink. My design is a mostly grungy one color.

If you were doing this from the perspective of a clothing designer what shirt/ink/mesh would you use?

I am thinking about 110 Mesh. Definitely plastisol ink, and I thought about Gildan shirts to start (I like a heavier shirt)....

I am hoping for either a "that's ok but this is better" kindof response or "your an idiot, don't do it", and maybe even a good place to purchase what your suggesting.

I'm drying with a heat gun to start. So an ink that is a little forgiving would be good.

I will do probably 50 shirts to start with.

I have *some* very light experience with silkscreening from a previous life working in a windshield manufacturing plant. Oh yeah and from my sign shop friends of course! (fyi - they do not do clothing AT ALL)

Jason
 

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Gildan is about as good as any. 110 is okay if you don't have any fine detail in your designs. A heat gun is iffy. Assuming you have lots of time and patience, it can be done. After you try one, come back for some more specific guidance. Good luck and God Bless.
 

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I think if you're going for a grungy look that something like discharge would be good, or even an extremely reduced white plastisol will give it a "vintage" or worn feeling. I really love the look and feel of discharge inks, but they aren't the friendliest to work with.
 

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think if you're going for a grungy look that something like discharge would be good, or even an extremely reduced white plastisol will give it a "vintage" or worn feeling. I really love the look and feel of discharge inks, but they aren't the friendliest to work with.
Don't try it. You will never manage discharge ink with a heat gun.
 
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