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I'm new to this forum. I've just recently started a t-shirt business using the heat press method. I noticed that you have produced some high quality shirts on your website using this same method. Are there any tips you can provide me to help me produce a high quality shirts such as yours? Equipment, Ink, Production process, etc? Your advice would be greatly appreciated. Please help!
 

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Re: I need help Muncheys

Hello, this is the stuff I use to make my shirts:

Epson 88 ($99 or cheaper), It uses only 4 ink cartridges (Black, Yellow, Red and Blue) the Durabrite ink it uses is water resistant.

I buy my opaque transfer sheets (for use on white or light and dark colored tees) from http://tshirtpaper.com/ ($88 100-sheets) i've bought and tested most of the inkjet paper that is out there and found that their sheets are one of the best. Also the washability of the transfers is outstanding, I have yet to get a complaint from a customer about cracking or peeling of the design.

When I first started I used a regular hand iron then I bought this heat press for $100 from this guy on ebay that was made from wood and an electric skillet. When I finally made enough I bought a Phoenix Heat press from http://imprintableswarehouse.com/. The Pheonix heat press rocks I don't have to worry about cold spots, uneven pressure or press time because it's all digital.

Here's a little story: I and two other friends each with their own t-shirt businesses started out at the same time. I chose to buy quality shirts, heat transfers and inks while my other two friends decided to go cheap and make their shirts with irregular t-shirts, generic inks and the paper transfers most commonly used for white and light colored t-shirts. We all did very well the first couple of weeks but they would get many complaints from their customers about their shirts. Stuff like the shirts fitted wierd or the images would bleed and the most common one is that the images were cracking and peeling off. They got so many refund and exchange request that they actually lost more money then they first started off with.

The funny thing is the difference between buying quality shirts, inks and heat transfers and cheap ones are just a few dollars more. Save yourself the trouble and use quality products to make your shirts, that would be the advice I am giving anyone just starting out.
 

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Re: I need help Muncheys

Thanks! You have given me so much help. I know now in order to produce you have to buy the best. How much did the Phoenix press run you?
 

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I've never heard of a phoenix press. I have a mighty press and it's pretty inexpensive but it works pretty well so far.
 

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kilerb said:
I've never heard of a phoenix press. I have a mighty press and it's pretty inexpensive but it works pretty well so far.
Phoenix is a popular brand and I believe you can get it and the Mighty press at Imprintibles.

I have the Hotronix 16x20 digital press. It also rocks!
 

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gmille39 said:
Phoenix is a popular brand and I believe you can get it and the Mighty press at Imprintibles.
You can.

gmille39 said:
I have the Hotronix 16x20 digital press. It also rocks!
The Phoenix, Mighty Press, and Hotronix are all manufactured by Stahls, so I guess in theory they would all rock equally ;)
 

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mredwards2u said:
Are there any tips you can provide me to help me produce a high quality shirts such as yours? Equipment, Ink, Production process, etc? Your advice would be greatly appreciated. Please help!
A good place to start is by going to a trade show.

In order to achieve good quality, you need to use good materials, inks and learn how thru reading , experimenting, doing jobs and so on...

Also looking at todays consummers and the crEative artist/designers and what they are doing, this will keep you in touch with the real selling world.

Perhaps have a look at some threads on the board that go into more detail about process etc.... good luck! :)

ED-it:::: Creative.
 

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Re: I need help Muncheys

Muncheys said:
Hello, this is the stuff I use to make my shirts:

Epson 88 ($99 or cheaper), It uses only 4 ink cartridges (Black, Yellow, Red and Blue) the Durabrite ink it uses is water resistant.

I buy my opaque transfer sheets (for use on white or light and dark colored tees) from http://tshirtpaper.com/ ($88 100-sheets) i've bought and tested most of the inkjet paper that is out there and found that their sheets are one of the best. Also the washability of the transfers is outstanding, I have yet to get a complaint from a customer about cracking or peeling of the design.

When I first started I used a regular hand iron then I bought this heat press for $100 from this guy on ebay that was made from wood and an electric skillet. When I finally made enough I bought a Phoenix Heat press from http://imprintableswarehouse.com/. The Pheonix heat press rocks I don't have to worry about cold spots, uneven pressure or press time because it's all digital.

Here's a little story: I and two other friends each with their own t-shirt businesses started out at the same time. I chose to buy quality shirts, heat transfers and inks while my other two friends decided to go cheap and make their shirts with irregular t-shirts, generic inks and the paper transfers most commonly used for white and light colored t-shirts. We all did very well the first couple of weeks but they would get many complaints from their customers about their shirts. Stuff like the shirts fitted wierd or the images would bleed and the most common one is that the images were cracking and peeling off. They got so many refund and exchange request that they actually lost more money then they first started off with.

The funny thing is the difference between buying quality shirts, inks and heat transfers and cheap ones are just a few dollars more. Save yourself the trouble and use quality products to make your shirts, that would be the advice I am giving anyone just starting out.
Can you show a picture of what you are able to produce?? Your website wasn't working. Thnx
 
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