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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello Everyone,

I am new to this forum. My name is Don Copeland and I am digital products manager for SWF East. We are the distributor for the DTG line of direct to garment printers - east of the Mississippi in the US.

Please feel free to PM me, email me ([email protected]) or call me at 877-793-3278 ext 122 with any quesitons or concerns about DTG printers

Thanks

Don
 

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Hi Don,
What's your view on DTG Printing on Dark shirts, is the technology up to it yet?
We constantly get varying views some say it works others are having problems with it. Has it been perfected or is there a way to go yet?
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
State of the White Ink Address

Currently - ALL white ink solutions for direct to garment printers require a pre-treatment (whether applied by the printer - Kornit or by the user - everybody else). The secret to consistent white ink prints is cosistent pre-treatment application. Once a user becomes proficient in this process - the biggest hurdle to good white ink prints has been cleared. The main white ink that is being bundled with direct to garment inks has a very good opacity, decent shelf life and good washability (when pre-treated and set right). Advances in software RIPs have made the generation of the white underbase and highlight layers (in most cases) have helped to reduce the white ink learning curve.

The pro's of printing white ink lie the ability to handle a wider array of garment decorating solutions. You can handle those shortrun dark shirt jobs without having to - send the customer elsewhere, kill yourself trying to set up screen s for a short run, trying to convince your customer to accept a print on a light colored shirt.

The con's of white ink printing generally involve the learning curve (its much easier to print on a white shirt), cost of output (6-10 times the cost of same image w/o white ink), attention to the ink itself (daily agitation suggested) and time (3-4 times longer to produce).

Issues such as clogging are not really any more prevailant with white ink than with other colors - contrary to popular belief. Frustration (due to the learning curve) causes the user to leave the machine unused for an extended period of time - which can lead to issues of clogging of all ink colors - not just white. Atrophy is a far worse enemy than overuse.

All in all, margins on direct printed garments are higher now than they ever will be (as more folks get these machines, prices on output will drop), and the time is now to begin to expose your customer base to direct to garment printing. While I wouldn't suggest opening a "harley" shirt store with white ink right away, I also wouldn't suggest that you ignore a large percentage of your potential customers by not offering white ink. Make it worth your white to print on darks (add $5 per shirt, whatever) - but at least offer it, if your customer asks why - tell the truth - it cost 6-10 times more to print on darks as it does on lights. You would charge for a 6 color job than a 4 color job (all other things being equal) wouldn't you??

This is the view from where I stand

Happy Printing

Don
SWF East


"I ink, therefore I am!"
 

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Don, what do you feel is the best way to expose your customers to this? It seems to be tough to advertise this service?? When does DTG come in to play as opposed to sublimation or digital transfers??
 
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