T-Shirt Forums banner
461 - 469 of 469 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
315 Posts
Curious where this information is exactly?

I just bought a full set of CMYKWWWW that I won't be able to use immediately (soon tho)... How should I maintain them in the meantime... just shake daily? Is a simple bag flip good enough, or should I give them a full shake up? Does it differ from when I have them plugged into the CISS versus brand new unopened bags?

On another note, have you guys experimented with using something to agitate the bags mechanically? For example using a back massager, sonic cleaner, kitchen blender (or whatever) sitting below a platform the bags lay on, connected to a wall plug timer.

Combining this with a software like PrinterJockey seems like it could do a lot of the maintenance automatically twice a day... a cheap and fairly simple setup that could relieve a lot of the pressure that this white ink maintenance shedule demands from printers that aren't working 9 to 5 everyday... just curious if it's too good to be true, what are your thoughts on something like this?

Yeah, I'm not thrilled with daily maintenance that will cost me $1000 if I don't print for a day or two... always looking for ways to work smarter, not harder. :)
You shoudl check out alienbunkers arduino contraption for stirring the ink. Great and cheap way to electronically do this.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
265 Posts
You shoudl check out alienbunkers arduino contraption for stirring the ink. Great and cheap way to electronically do this.
That's a neat little WIMS system, but he doesn't mention total system cost... and it looks like it's only good for open air bottles (not bagged / degassed ink)... and it appears to only handle one ink cartridge... by the time you extrapolate four carts into the system, it's no small project and who knows the total cost in time and parts sourcing??

I was thinking something much simpler, like a back massager touching an aluminum tray with the bagged ink on it... just as simple as using an IV rack to hang the bags.

I'm surprised the ink companies (or anyone on forums) aren't discussing tips/tricks like this already... I mean, who wants to give white ink a handjob everyday if they don't have too? Buy a $10 massager, a wall timer and a cookie sheet... Done.

I was hoping to hear from someone who's already tried everything they could to keep the white flowing... *ahem*ImageArmor*ahem*... ;)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
91 Posts
I have come to the conclusion to go back to Dupont.

IA whites are powerful, however that may be the reason it clogs up the printers. The separation of the inks is a flaw not a benefit. That ink will get stuck in dampers and cartridges and just build up.

The CMYK has been going fine with the exception of magenta acting up sometimes. However documentation for this ink is minimal. Is there an expiration date for these inks? Don't see anything on the label. What is the average printhead life using these inks everyday under best practices?

Dupont has been in the field for a while. It does have room for improvement, but it has never given me downtime like IA did. I don't like the idea of being an unpaid beta tester for new inks (IA or others). Think this will be my last experiment for the "perfect ink".

If any one has used image armor for over 6 months with no issues, I would like to know your setup and maintenance routine.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,530 Posts
Discussion Starter · #464 ·
There is a pretty sick new A3 DTG coming out soon called Katana. I am told They will be incorporating what you are suggesting - a vibrational ink tray as an extra to add to their printer upon purchase, among many other cool features for a sub 10k DTG - one being print head and capping station audrino controls.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
36 Posts
Update... I have been using IA ink for about 8 weeks now and loving it. It took us about 2 week and 30 shirts to dial in the process. About the same time it took us when we first started to use DTG with DuPont ink. I keep reading folks with head clogs and blaming the ink etc. I too had some head clogging in the first two weeks. I dialed in our process and now we have no head clogs at all. For us the temperature and humidity of our work area was too high. We lowered the room temp and started to do a timed nozzle clean at night and now every morning for the past 6 weeks a perfect nozzle check every time. I never got that with DuPont. I could not be happier. (Just gave you a tick)

The rest of the process when it comes to ICC profiles and image preparing is the same as before. We see no color change when printed vs heating. The CMYK may be a little more vivid and in some cases that is a concern but not for 95% of our prints. Just some artists when we reproduce there work show concerns.

White ink… WOW… I cannot remember the last time we had a miss prints do to improperly pretreating on dark shirts. I use to have 5-8 % waste with DuPont on large orders. I have been amazed to say the least. The only concern I have is that with our method of printing white under base we use a gradient under base and it seem we need, in our process, to increase the white under base. Not a big deal since the ink is 150 a liter and not 300 like when we started using DTG. So the extra cost is not felt so far. If you do not place the extra white down the print looks good and will washes well but it will not stretch well, sometime that not a concern. If we lay down a thicker white under base all is good.

The new RIP Onepass feature is so cool now. With DuPont I could never get it to work all the time. Now we can use this feature 85% of the time. The only issue we see is with reds that have full white around them. Reds seem to drift into the white making what I call a smear. Other than that what a time saver and the prints are so clear.

I know unsolicited advice is seldom heard but here we go. In our environment we had to try different methods and adjust our process. Expect to spend a few hundred bucks in test materials and inks to dial in the new ink to your environment. It is not plug_and_play like a PC. It will take your diligence and willingness to review your current process to make this change. It may take you a weekend or a month to dial in your process. It took us 2 weeks. The outcome was so worth it and the 45 sec cure may not seem like a big deal. But my staff dose not sits around waiting in between loading drying and packing shirts. So that non press twice for 90 sec for white ink we did with DuPont has free up the staff to do all kind of things in between shirt loads.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
32 Posts
After many months to fight with IA inks and clogging, I come back to Dupont too. I tried longtime because I wanted to believe that problem comes from me.
Too much time and $ spent...Price, results, and cure time are very good points.

But with 2 printers with IA, I changed 5 printheads (and few dampers) in about 7-8 months. With Dupont, not one in few years (with worse environment conditions).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
96 Posts
After many months to fight with IA inks and clogging, I come back to Dupont too. I tried longtime because I wanted to believe that problem comes from me.
Too much time and $ spent...Price, results, and cure time are very good points.

But with 2 printers with IA, I changed 5 printheads (and few dampers) in about 7-8 months. With Dupont, not one in few years (with worse environment conditions).
5 Printheads !!!!!! WTF
I also think we got another formulate with Europe user that why people are getting problem with IA
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
32 Posts
5 Printheads !!!!!! WTF
I also think we got another formulate with Europe user that why people are getting problem with IA
Possible...First time I ordered my ink from USA (because no european dealer) and not many problems.

If i'm sure it's only that I will order from US but don't want to take the risk (and lose more time/money).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
Good morning t-shirt people- I am a table linen lady also using DTG and ask your opinion on various water-based inks for natural fabrics only- I am thrilled with the original print but feel they fuzz up a bit after washing and I never knew about pre-treatment- could this help secure the images? I thought it was due to fabric abrasion in the washing/drying process. My linens come starched and I wonder if that is acting as a pre-treatment (by luck) I notice the entries here are from several years ago- hope you are all out there!!!
Thank you,
Lori
 
461 - 469 of 469 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top