T-Shirt Forums banner
1 - 8 of 8 Posts

· Registered
Joined
·
46 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi,
I'm planning to purchase a Roland VersaCAMM VS-300i printer/cutter. I would like to make fully printed and laminated stickers. My question is, what lamination machine do you guys recommend for 30 inches?

And what is the workflow from print, laminate, cut?

Thank you!
 

· Registered
Joined
·
621 Posts
I don't have a laminator recommendation but eco-solvent resins like in the Roland are engineered to last for three to five years outdoors without lamination. This is mostly UV resistance. On a car, detergent from repeated washings can reduce this. Lamination with the VersaCamm would be printing, out gassing, laminating, reloading, aligning, cutting. Something a bit easier with separate print cut machines, but still possible on print/cut combo, if it has good registration/optical eyes.

If you just print/cut, its far easier and lasts a reasonable amount of time in the weather. As it can take a day or more to outgas, takes time to laminate, reload, align and cut your per job time is going to go way up. If it just lasts three to five years instead of seven to ten, you can just sell them another three years later. It's more critical in large applications like wraps.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
46 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I don't have a laminator recommendation but eco-solvent resins like in the Roland are engineered to last for three to five years outdoors without lamination. This is mostly UV resistance. On a car, detergent from repeated washings can reduce this. Lamination with the VersaCamm would be printing, out gassing, laminating, reloading, aligning, cutting. Something a bit easier with separate print cut machines, but still possible on print/cut combo, if it has good registration/optical eyes.

If you just print/cut, its far easier and lasts a reasonable amount of time in the weather. As it can take a day or more to outgas, takes time to laminate, reload, align and cut your per job time is going to go way up. If it just lasts three to five years instead of seven to ten, you can just sell them another three years later. It's more critical in large applications like wraps.
Hi. Thank you for that information. I have tried print with no laminate and it does scratch really easily. It also seems all of the sticker companies like Sticker Mule or Sticker Robot uses laminate. I wanted to make those type of stickers.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
781 Posts
Hi. Thank you for that information. I have tried print with no laminate and it does scratch really easily. It also seems all of the sticker companies like Sticker Mule or Sticker Robot uses laminate. I wanted to make those type of stickers.
We have been printing on vinyl for a long time, here is what i can tell you.

ALL graphics that go on a vehicle should be laminated.
"most" companies producing signage (including small decals) laminate pretty much everything they print.

Some interior stuff is not laminated (but more often then not, it still is...just with a matte laminate).

We laminate about 90% of everything we print.

These cam out many years after we bought our laminators, but I know a lot of shops that use them. If we needed to buy one we would go with one of these. All Models : USTECH, Home of Master worf laminator

Lamination also aids in the installation, and removal of the prints.
Window perf (view thru window prints) need to be laminated or your clients will not be able to see out the windows you put it on when it rains. It also stops dirt from getting in the holes and making it difficult to see out anytime. Also this needs to be optically clear laminate. Other wise you will have a hazy window that looks foggy all the time (this is the adhesive you would be seeing).

Your work flow is..print, outgas, laminate, cut.
It is NOT easier with 2 separate machines, but it can be more productive if you have enough prints to keep the printer busy all day.
It is VERY easy to line it back up in the printer.

Here is a huge time saving tip...
Leave a sharpie on the top of the printer...maybe a bright magenta...but black is fine too. When you set up the printer to print, vinyl loaded and versaworks is waiting for you to hit print...
Take your sharpie and make two marks, one on the right side and one on the left side of the vinyl. These marks should be lining up with a "line" in the heat platen. If you did it correctly you will just line up those 2 marks and switch your settings to cut. Probably sounds confusing but it latterly takes 10 seconds to put the marks and you can load it back in the machine in less then 30 seconds.

If you didn't fallow that I can try to post a pic or two to show what I mean.
If you have any other questions about it let me know.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Projec

· Registered
Joined
·
46 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
We have been printing on vinyl for a long time, here is what i can tell you.

ALL graphics that go on a vehicle should be laminated.
"most" companies producing signage (including small decals) laminate pretty much everything they print.

Some interior stuff is not laminated (but more often then not, it still is...just with a matte laminate).

We laminate about 90% of everything we print.

These cam out many years after we bought our laminators, but I know a lot of shops that use them. If we needed to buy one we would go with one of these. All Models : USTECH, Home of Master worf laminator

Lamination also aids in the installation, and removal of the prints.
Window perf (view thru window prints) need to be laminated or your clients will not be able to see out the windows you put it on when it rains. It also stops dirt from getting in the holes and making it difficult to see out anytime. Also this needs to be optically clear laminate. Other wise you will have a hazy window that looks foggy all the time (this is the adhesive you would be seeing).

Your work flow is..print, outgas, laminate, cut.
It is NOT easier with 2 separate machines, but it can be more productive if you have enough prints to keep the printer busy all day.
It is VERY easy to line it back up in the printer.

Here is a huge time saving tip...
Leave a sharpie on the top of the printer...maybe a bright magenta...but black is fine too. When you set up the printer to print, vinyl loaded and versaworks is waiting for you to hit print...
Take your sharpie and make two marks, one on the right side and one on the left side of the vinyl. These marks should be lining up with a "line" in the heat platen. If you did it correctly you will just line up those 2 marks and switch your settings to cut. Probably sounds confusing but it latterly takes 10 seconds to put the marks and you can load it back in the machine in less then 30 seconds.

If you didn't fallow that I can try to post a pic or two to show what I mean.
If you have any other questions about it let me know.
Hi,
I would love to see some pictures. If you have a video of the process, that'd be amazing too! Do you cut all your stickers perforated?
 

· Registered
Joined
·
45 Posts
Thanks for the recommendation. Stahls also recommended Royal Sovereign. When you were making stickers, did you do perforated cuts? Which printer/cutter did you use?
I used the Roland VP540 54" cutter, did all cuts, Versaworks and Roland make it pretty straight forward for print cutting.. I laminated everything.... When you print use Versas registration marks with your images, give it a day to gas off then laminate it, line it back up in the machine using the reg marks, machine finds the marks then cuts, Versa has spots to set your cut line and your perf line (slow down your cut speed on the perf cut or it will tear out your stickers) I used Corel for my designs so it was just a matter of assigning spot colors as my Perf Cut and normal cut... I hope that helps
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top