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Hi, Does anyone have any tips or tricks achieving turquoise on mp5i. I've tried everything including legacy on and off, CMYK mode, RGB mode, playing with saturation and contrast and brightness, recoloring artwork in variant shades of turquoise, and all my prints still result in light blue or baby blue? Maybe I'm doing something wrong but I just don't understand why I can't get results. I've spent hours on the line with techs and still can't get to anything close to turquoise. Advice would be greatly appreciated.
 

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Hi, Does anyone have any tips or tricks achieving turquoise on mp5i. I've tried everything including legacy on and off, CMYK mode, RGB mode, playing with saturation and contrast and brightness, recoloring artwork in variant shades of turquoise, and all my prints still result in light blue or baby blue? Maybe I'm doing something wrong but I just don't understand why I can't get results. I've spent hours on the line with techs and still can't get to anything close to turquoise. Advice would be greatly appreciated.

Hi

Are you creating your graphic in CMYK from the get go?

Try this on photoshop:

Create a new document. Set to the settings to work in the CMYK workspace.

On the top menu, click "Window" and open up the Swatches tab.

Once the Swatch table window opens.. click the drop down menu bar on the right of the swatch window (right underneath the X to close the window)

Choose PANTONE CMYK Coated and replace your current default swatches. Widen the table so that you can scroll around and see more of the colors.

Choose a color that closest represents the turquoise you are looking for and start from there.

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Since these Pantone swatches are based off of CMYK you can already see the color limitations. (like you wont find a TRUE RED anywhere in there)

I explained why that is in previous posts.. RED and BLUE are primary colors. In order to get a true turquoise.. you would need a PRIMARY Blue mixed with green. Right off the bat, you cant create a TRUE BLUE using CMYK.
...


ill repost what i had mentioned before about CMYK color mixes:

Things to remember... for example:

Red is a primary color. Imagine I gave you an actual watercolor paint set composed of just CMYK paints and I asked you to make a pure bright red. You cant. You can get close, but the reds will always be slightly yellow tinted or slightly magenta tinted. Same goes for creating orange. You need red and yellow to make orange. You don't have red, nor can you create a pure red with the inks you have. Hopefully, this make more sense.

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The printer is not using RGB inks so keep that in mind when you are creating your artwork. Create the image in CMYK... when you convert it back to RGB the colors wont change, you'll just be able to save it as the png file we recommend. Also, when you drop the image on the RIP always make sure you check the "enable icc previewb box" to get a more accurate look at what the printer is able to output.


Hope this helps!
 

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Deana did an awesome job with that post! Turquoise is a difficult color to hit right away. If what Deana said still doesn't get you exactly what you need, try 2 color passes in different rip settings. Your first color pass can stay flat in your rip on the color correction with a spray pattern set to FINE and WIDE and then when that one finishes try running a second color pass with the rip set at SPEED and NARROW. When you change the direction that the nozzles fire, sometimes you can get lucky if you know what your doing and hit that color dead on. Most of the time, the Speed pass is set with the brightness maxed out and the saturation maxed out, so it gives the first past a tint of color. You really have to play with this method until you master it, but once you get the hang of it, you can hit some crazy colors. This 2 pass "cross spray pattern" kinda plays a part in covering more "dots per inches". This method works for when you have issues when the printer wont lay down a solid block of color. 2 passes, different spray patterns, and speed methods. The second pass hits where the first pass missed. Kinda like painting a wall will horizontal strokes and coming back painting it with vertical strokes.
 
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