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Hi Everyone,

This is my first post, so let me introduce myself. I have a bit of experience silkscreening, and I've mainly learned by hanging out at a local sign company and being shown how to screen. But I'm definitely a newbie.

Recently, I've taken on a personal project that requires silkscreening white graphics ontop of 4 different sized powdercoated steel panels. After sending samples of the material to Nazdar, they've recommended their 9600 series of inks along with the NB80 catalyst.

My first attempt went badly. We mixed the ink and catalyst by volume instead of weight and my DIY screen wasn't nearly tight enough. After only screening 3 panels, the ink started drying and the screen was ruined.

After talking to Nazdar again, they said I also need the 9631 Retarder (only sold by the gallon. $100.. and I only use an eyedropper full of the stuff.. lame) and that "nobody uses 9600 without the retarder", something I really wish they'd put in their datasheets.

The second attempt went a lot better. The ink,catalyst,retarder were mixed properly. But, towards the end of the run, the ink started drying up in the screen again. All the acetone in the world didn't seem to clean it up, and my new aluminium framed screen got ruined again. But at least the panels got screened properly.

For my third attempt, I really want to get this right. I've identified some things I was doing wrong.. and I'd really like to get some help from people on this forum to make sure nothing goes wrong again.

What I know I did wrong the last time:
- took way too long between each panel. Will get some help next time to remove and load panels.
- I think I'm "flooding" wrong.
- I never added any additional ink during the screening process
- I didn't have the proper cleaning chemical on hand.
- I've never been taught how to clean up properly


So, my questions are.. (forgive the long rant)

How do you flood properly? Is this pass to spread a thick layer of ink overtop of the screen, so it doesn't dry?

What should I have on hand to clean after? The nazdar datasheet says there is a specific cleaner for the 9600 series of inks.

What else can I do to make sure the ink doesn't dry while I'm screening? I'm guessing adding more ink during the process helps, same with going faster? :)


Any other help would be much appreciated.

Mike
 

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Boy, I wish I had some real help for you, but catalyzed ink for flatwork like that is why I do shirts--but I can give you a hint or two.

You are on the right track in having help--you will want to put the ink in only when you are ready to book out everything you can, and as far as flooding goes, whether metal, paper, or t-shirt, I do not put a layer of ink on top of the whole stencil, I just put ink in the open areas--squeegee more or less up and down. As to how exactly to do that, only practice will help you. Get some tempera or something you won't be ruining screens with, hopefully a similar consistency, and do some practice with that before you get on the real stuff. Adding more ink as you go will help, but if you're not putting down enough ink to consume the stuff that's half evaporated, you just have more ink in the screen to wreck and dispose of.

Although many of those catalyzed inks are incredibly nasty, the stuff you need to clean them up with is often worse--read the MSDS very carefully for each item you're using, and use and dispose of them properly--you don't make money in a hospital bed or getting fined.

And remember, "They say rather than cursing the darkness, one should light a candle. They don't mention anything about cursing a lack of candles." --George Carlin
 

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Nazdar 9600 + NB80 questions. lots of questions...
Hi Everyone,

This is my first post, so let me introduce myself. I have a bit of experience silkscreening, and I've mainly learned by hanging out at a local sign company and being shown how to screen. But I'm definitely a newbie.

Recently, I've taken on a personal project that requires silkscreening white graphics ontop of 4 different sized powdercoated steel panels. After sending samples of the material to Nazdar, they've recommended their 9600 series of inks along with the NB80 catalyst.

My first attempt went badly. We mixed the ink and catalyst by volume instead of weight and my DIY screen wasn't nearly tight enough. After only screening 3 panels, the ink started drying and the screen was ruined.

After talking to Nazdar again, they said I also need the 9631 Retarder (only sold by the gallon. $100.. and I only use an eyedropper full of the stuff.. lame) and that "nobody uses 9600 without the retarder", something I really wish they'd put in their datasheets.

The second attempt went a lot better. The ink,catalyst,retarder were mixed properly. But, towards the end of the run, the ink started drying up in the screen again. All the acetone in the world didn't seem to clean it up, and my new aluminium framed screen got ruined again. But at least the panels got screened properly.

For my third attempt, I really want to get this right. I've identified some things I was doing wrong.. and I'd really like to get some help from people on this forum to make sure nothing goes wrong again.

What I know I did wrong the last time:
- took way too long between each panel. Will get some help next time to remove and load panels.
- I think I'm "flooding" wrong.
- I never added any additional ink during the screening process
- I didn't have the proper cleaning chemical on hand.
- I've never been taught how to clean up properly


So, my questions are.. (forgive the long rant)

How do you flood properly? Is this pass to spread a thick layer of ink overtop of the screen, so it doesn't dry?

What should I have on hand to clean after? The nazdar datasheet says there is a specific cleaner for the 9600 series of inks.

What else can I do to make sure the ink doesn't dry while I'm screening? I'm guessing adding more ink during the process helps, same with going faster? :)


Any other help would be much appreciated.

Mike

9600 Polyester Screen Ink is a solvent-based ink and as such will dry as the solvents evaporate.This air-drying process is unavoidable. However, there are some things you can do to extend the screen stability.


1) You’re already using the 9631 Retarder. You can add up to 10% of the 9631, which will result in an ink mixture that dries slower than the 9600 ink without 9631.
2) Do your best to control the air-flow around the print station. Anything that creates air movement will accelerate the evaporation of the solvents. Fans, air-conditioners, heaters, swinging doors, open windows, etc.
3) A coarse mesh should also help. A finer mesh count (305 tpi for example) will result in faster screen dry-in than a more coarse mesh (200 tpi for example). Be sure the application and image allows for the use of a more coarse mesh.
4) Proper flood use and technique. “Flooding” is the process of filling the screen with ink using a heavily angled squeegee (~60° would be typical) stroke. The purpose is not to push ink through the screen but to leave a relatively heavy layer of ink in the mesh and on top of the mesh. A flooded screen will dry slower than an un-flooded screen. The screen should be flooded whenever the printing process has come to a stop. In between substrate changes, etc.
5) IMAGESTAR IMS201 Premium Graphic Screen Wash is recommended for cleaning the 9600 Series Ink.
6) Also, I checked into different sizes of the 9631 Retarder and if there was a free sample I could send you, but this product only comes in gallons and no samples are available.

I hope this information is helpful.
 
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