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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello,

I'm using Ecotex Flash White NP on my T-shirts.

It's washing off of the t-shirts like it never cured when they go through the wash.

I use a Black Flash heating device that I swing over the shirts.

Did I buy the wrong Plastisol ink?

What is a good ink to use that will be permanent?

Thank you.
 

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Are the shirts Polyester? If they are did you use the poly additive?

Where did you purchase the shirts? If from a retailer such as WalMart, it may have some kind of fire resistant treatment on them.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Are the shirts Polyester? If they are did you use the poly additive?

Where did you purchase the shirts? If from a retailer such as WalMart, it may have some kind of fire resistant treatment on them.
No, I did not use a poly additive... Didn't even know I had to. You learn something every day....

Thanks for responding. I would get the shirts from Michaels in the past. Sometimes from Walmat. The test shirts I tried were "JERZEES" 50% Cotton 50% Polyester.

I'm now buying my Shirts from "JiffyShirts". Gildan mostly, 50% cotton, 50% polyester.

One of the first shirts I did about 6 years ago is still holding its ink. It was 50/50 and a JERZEES. It was a different ink.

Is there a Plastisol brand ink that is made for a 50/50 blend?

Thanks.
 

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You don't need additive to print on polyester or 50/50 t-shirts. The ink you have will do.
The problem is that these new non-PVC non-phthalate plastisols are not really plastisol and have ridiculous long curing times.
You need to cure this ink at 310-320F for at least 120 seconds... I'd recommend 180 to be safe.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
You don't need additive to print on polyester or 50/50 t-shirts. The ink you have will do.
The problem is that these new non-PVC non-phthalate plastisols are not really plastisol and have ridiculous long curing times.
You need to cure this ink at 310-320F for at least 120 seconds... I'd recommend 180 to be safe.
Wow, that amount of time will certainly bring production down. I was only doing about 10 seconds. Anything more would burn the shirt. I guess i will have to raise the heater. Arent there any quicker plastisols?
 

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Arent there any quicker plastisols?
Regular PVC plastisol is fast... these non-PVC inks are a totally different thing.

Wow, that amount of time will certainly bring production down. I was only doing about 10 seconds. Anything more would burn the shirt. I guess i will have to raise the heater.
10 seconds is barely enough for regular plastisol as well. I actually cure all colors for for at least 20 seconds to be on the safe side.
Having said that, curing time is subject to technique and perception.
What I call curing time starts from the point the ink reaches its minimum curing temperature, and ends when the shirt exits the oven.
If I set the temperature to 155 C (320F) it will fluctuate but will never go over 165C (that's around 330F).
The shirt will not burn at 330F even if I leave it there for 3 minutes.
 
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