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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey Guys!
I have been searching the site for days trying to find out how to actually mock-up a t-shirt design , I have the mock-up tee & design I just dont know how to make the mock-up graphic ,
thanks in advance
-James:)
 

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Hey Guys!
I have been searching the site for days trying to find out how to actually mock-up a t-shirt design , I have the mock-up tee & design I just dont know how to make the mock-up graphic ,
thanks in advance
-James:)
You just take the tee design, copy it, and paste it on the blank mock up tee graphic.

That's the general instructions.

We'd probably need more specific information on what exactly you have tried to do and what exact problems you've had when you tried to help you work through it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
im running a mac ,
so i dont know where i could copy & paste graphic's
sorry im really new to my mac , i just got it recently,

i was thinking there was a way to do it in photoshop somehow?
 

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I would think in photoshop you would have your mock up tee on one layer and create a new layer with your design, then overlay it on the first layer. Hope this helps :)
 

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depends on if your 'mock-up tee design' (blank shirt) and your 'tee design' (graphics to be printed on shirt) were produced in photoshop or corel or illustrator etc.

if they were done in photoshop just open both files. position the windows so one is atop the other. click anywhere on your mock-up tee file. open your layers window. create new layer. name it whatever. make sure it is the top layer in this layer window. now go to the other file which has your graphics. make sure everything is unlocked. use your selection tool ( drag across design) to select your design. go to edit up on your menu bar. edit>copy. close that file. (save changes if you want). go to your mock-up tee file again. go to edit up on your menu bar. edit> paste. it should paste into that layer that you had created minutes earlier. you shold be able to see that this layer is atop the blank tee layer. you might have to resize and move around etc. but that's the basics.

if your files are in another format just use the import function instead of copy/paste. just make sure that you import them into separate layers and your design is atop you mock-up tee layer.

it all gets easier. just practice. practice. -peace.
 

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Take pic of a blank shirt
open the file in photoshop
open the design file also
drag the design screen to the shirt screen (resize design as needed prior to moving the design over)

this is a quick sample
 

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The cool thing about using the GoMedia template or the template Jimiyo uses is that they include a layer mask...so if you want to show how the artwork is going to look in areas of the shirt that are off center, you can move the artwork around and even hang it off the edge of the shirt. The mask will make the artwork appear to be on the shirt instead of hanging over the edge of the shirt and going into the background. It also helps the designer see what a design might look like in areas other than center.
 

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I'd definitely favor a mockup worn by a model. In my tests they sell at least 2X better (closer to 3X for women's clothing) than empty shirt mockups. While the free Threadless mockups are a great deal, they may be no better than just showing your artwork in a popup lightbox.

The Graphic River mockup uses displacement maps so the image conforms to the shirt. You need PhotoShop or similar, though.
 

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I'd definitely favor a mockup worn by a model. In my tests they sell at least 2X better (closer to 3X for women's clothing) than empty shirt mockups. While the free Threadless mockups are a great deal, they may be no better than just showing your artwork in a popup lightbox.

The Graphic River mockup uses displacement maps so the image conforms to the shirt. You need PhotoShop or similar, though.
Agreed. I found a guy who is selling his mock ups on that site too...or a site similar and he has human mock ups. I think my next venture is finding a friend and setting up a photo shoot to make my own mock ups.

Then read up on displacement maps :)
(Ill post that guys link when I get home. We dont have youtube at work)
 

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Live models are good, but if the model isn't a match for the clothing the sales can actually be hurt. For instance, a male model with heavy tattoos can hurt sales if you're aiming for a suburban or family market. That type of model is great for urban or grunge (or musicians).

You can often find a mannequin torso for about $100, sometimes less if used. I'd opt for one with adjustable arms rather than armless. If you sell unisex tees a male torso will work, but any shirt designed for a woman should ideally be shown on a female torso.

For the individual shopping cart pages I actually avoid shots with a face in them, unless you have lots and lots of models. Looking at the same model for every design in a site gets really boring. I think the full-face models are ideally saved for the main lifestyle photos for the site.
 
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