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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Yesterday, I was trying to do some test t-shirts using the sample plastisol transfers that I've received and every time I tried to preheat my heat press, the power to my office went out.

So far I've received some great samples and information from First Edition, Transfer Express and Dowling Graphics.

I guess the heat press is pulling too much juice for my home office outlet, so I've called the electrician and he's coming by this afternoon to give me an estimate to get it working.

I'm not exactly sure what I should be asking him to do. I know the press is 20 amps, so I think I might need a dedicated plugin for it. Don't know the right electrical terminology :)

I searched through the forums and only found one post about not having enough power, I'm surprised it doesn't come up more for those working from home.
 

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Rodney, get at least a 30 amp dedicated circuit just for your press, it will cost the same (may be a little more for the cable, breaker etc.) for the guy to install it and a little more juice is ok if need be.

If there is other stuff plugged to the same circuit (although the fuse may not blow) it will cause the press temp. settings to vary.... you may ruin some transfers.

but like Josh said.... 20 amp will do.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
You definitely need a dedicated 20 amp circuit. The press pulls 14.5 amps.
Whoops, I thought it pulled 20amps (I read the 20 on the back).

Does a dedicated 20 amp circuit just mean another wall outlet tied to a different switch on the breaker box?

Do you have any other items plugged into the same circuit that could be moved?
If I understand correctly, all the plugs in my office go to the same switch on the circuit breaker. Actually, there's another room upstairs that is on the same circuit as my office which is probably using some of my juice.

Rodney, get at least a 30 amp dedicated circuit just for your press, it will cost the same (may be a little more for the cable, breaker etc.) for the guy to install it and a little more juice is ok if need be.
Thanks, I'll ask about doing a 30 amp as well.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
This is my one major concern with getting a heat press. The power in my house goes out if you plug in a microwave!

I rent, so I can't really have an electrician come in
Maybe you could tell your landlord that your microwave needs a dedicated 20 amp circuit :)

But seriously, the is one aspect I didn't pay enough attention to when thinking about a heat press.

I think part of it is the size of the press. I'm pretty sure the 16x20 is going to be more of a strain than a 15x15 heat press.
 

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I also rent and my, um...unique solution to this problem was thusly:

Our house is OOOLLLD and we knew when we moved in that we'd be fairly tight in terms of load vs available power in the study (two computers, a server and a fishtank). We found out that there are two circuits in the house - one running down the side where the bedrooms are and one running down the other side (living room/kitchen/laundry).

I run an extension lead from my kitchen to my study, and turn off the other stuff in the kitchen.

Works for me! As I said, I also rent like Jasonda, so having someone come in to do wiring wasn't really an option.

Hope you get your press sorted out soon, Rodney!
 

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I think part of it is the size of the press. I'm pretty sure the 16x20 is going to be more of a strain than a 15x15 heat press.
Nope, not really. I have a Hix 16x20 Swingman and it pulls 14.5 amps as well.

I also rent, but luckily my office is in a room directly across from the kitchen and my kitchen has three separate 20 amp circuits. So I do the same as Kath and run a heavy duty extension cord to the kitchen when I need to run the press.
 

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I think part of it is the size of the press. I'm pretty sure the 16x20 is going to be more of a strain than a 15x15 heat press.
Yep, a 15x15 heat press pulls a lower current, less than 10amps I believe.

Rodney, I think you should also ask your electrician to check the main powerline to your house, and also the size of the cable/wire. Higher electrical loads would also require higher rated larger size cable/wire, not just a higher amp breaker.
 

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Nope, not really. I have a Hix 16x20 Swingman and it pulls 14.5 amps as well.

I also rent, but luckily my office is in a room directly across from the kitchen and my kitchen has three separate 20 amp circuits. So I do the same as Kath and run a heavy duty extension cord to the kitchen when I need to run the press.
You have to be careful when running that kind of power through an extension cord. You can cause a fire. I only bring this up because my friend's house just burned down yesterday, possibly due to an electrical fire. So make sure the cord is rated to carry the kind of power you're running through it.
 

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You have to be careful when running that kind of power through an extension cord. You can cause a fire. I only bring this up because my friend's house just burned down yesterday, possibly due to an electrical fire. So make sure the cord is rated to carry the kind of power you're running through it.
Thanks Louie for mentioning that. I made sure before doing it that this extension cord I bought was rated for the load and the length.

I'm very sorry to hear about your friend's house. I pray that no one was injured.

Fire is one of my biggest fears.
 

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Yep, a 15x15 heat press pulls a lower current, less than 10amps I believe.

Rodney, I think you should also ask your electrician to check the main powerline to your house, and also the size of the cable/wire. Higher electrical loads would also require higher rated larger size cable/wire, not just a higher amp breaker.

Oooops! Sorry, I misunderstood. I was thinking Rodney's 14.5 amp press was a 15x15.
 

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Thanks Louie for mentioning that. I made sure before doing it that this extension cord I bought was rated for the load and the length.

I'm very sorry to hear about your friend's house. I pray that no one was injured.

Fire is one of my biggest fears.
Everyone was ok, just smoke inhalation, but they lost most of their belongings. Very sad. I wouldn't want the same to happen to anyone else.
 

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Rodney, did you check the contact screws that connect the circuit breaker to the Electrical panel ? and see if they are loose ? ... if they are, this will trigger the breaker because the contact ends create an electical gap (like a sparkplug). :)

Yes Im a girl. :rolleyes: :)
 

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If I understand correctly, all the plugs in my office go to the same switch on the circuit breaker. Actually, there's another room upstairs that is on the same circuit as my office which is probably using some of my juice.
Hey Rodney,

Your electrician can do one of two things.

!. Run a new set of wires down the wall and set you a new outlet and a new breaker dedicated to that one outlet.(If you want to throw a few terms at him, tell him to fish tape the new wires and use Madison hangers to mount the new box.

2. He could possibly split one wall outlet out and use it as a dedicated circuit.

FYI... On a 20 amp breaker, you don't want more than about 16 amps draw total. Even though its rated at 20 you will find it hard to draw a full 20 without tripping the circuit.

Hope this helps.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Hey Rodney,

Your electrician can do one of two things.

!. Run a new set of wires down the wall and set you a new outlet and a new breaker dedicated to that one outlet.(If you want to throw a few terms at him, tell him to fish tape the new wires and use Madison hangers to mount the new box.

2. He could possibly split one wall outlet out and use it as a dedicated circuit.

FYI... On a 20 amp breaker, you don't want more than about 16 amps draw total. Even though its rated at 20 you will find it hard to draw a full 20 without tripping the circuit.

Hope this helps.
Thanks Terry, that helps as well. It'll be nice to be able to suggest to him exactly what's needed in "his" terms :)

When you say run a new set of wires down the wall, do you mean on the "inside" of the wall, or down the outside where I could see it?

FYI... On a 20 amp breaker, you don't want more than about 16 amps draw total. Even though its rated at 20 you will find it hard to draw a full 20 without tripping the circuit.
This helps as well. Makes me wonder if I can get away with a 30 amp like T-Bot suggested :)
 
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