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Hi, I have been using waterbased inks, but I have been playing around with plastisol inks every now and again. From what I gather 110t is too big of a mesh for plastisol and I have done some good prints using 196t. For finer details, im not so sure as the next higher mesh I have is 305 and it might be too high for plastisol.


Just want to know what people use for finer details and half tones, when using plastisol inks?


Also when doing 4 colour process prints, is 305t ok for plastisol?
 

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The only time I really use 110 is for a white underbase. Most designs with spot colors I run at 156. For process printing I usually stick with 230 and up.

I prefer a more "vintage" look to my prints so I like to run higher mesh for less ink deposits.

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mostly print thru 158 mesh for general prints. White ink thru 125 or 110 if you want a heavy deposit. 305 would be max for fine detail / fine halftones, but you'll have to probably thin the ink slightly more. We usually add a little curable reducer to all our inks, Union ink seems to arrive slightly thick.
 

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We use 110 mostly for white underbase and if you want a white design that is not really super high quality. You will need less hits to get a good coverage. We use a lot of 156/160 screens as a general go to. We have had great results with a 280 for 4 colour process. It really depends on the design, the emulsion you use and how fluid your inks are. Temperature will also dictate how your inks will flow. In mid summer we may use a 200, but come winter with the same design we may need to bring it down to a 156/160. It's really trial and error.

Also, keep in mind that we found that when you change mesh size we had to adjust our exposure time. Again trial and error. And going with coloured mesh will also change your exposure time required. Some suppliers will use different colour mesh for different mesh counts.

Hope that helps!
 

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Use 110 mesh if you want a heavier ink deposit. Or if you are using a thick, metallic ink (like silver of gold). I have also used 110 to print on transfer paper when I don't know how many shirts might be ordered. I print a bunch of the design on transfer paper that I can later print onto a T-shirt with a heat press. For this purpose, I usually want to have a heavier ink deposit. But, if you want more fine detail on your shirts, try playing with something in between 100 and 300. Something like 156 or 230. I usually don't go above 230.
 

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Yes, I agree with Bob that the mesh count can be largely a matter of preference. It's like finding a balance between a light touch (and softer feel) with a higher mesh count versus a thicker, more opaque deposit with a lower mesh count.
 

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wouldn’t you need to reverse the image for printing on the paper ?

Use 110 mesh if you want a heavier ink deposit. Or if you are using a thick, metallic ink (like silver of gold). I have also used 110 to print on transfer paper when I don't know how many shirts might be ordered. I print a bunch of the design on transfer paper that I can later print onto a T-shirt with a heat press. For this purpose, I usually want to have a heavier ink deposit. But, if you want more fine detail on your shirts, try playing with something in between 100 and 300. Something like 156 or 230. I usually don't go above 230.
 

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It is possible to print transfers without reversing the image.
You just have to use printable adhesive as a base layer, instead of powder as a top layer.
You need to explain that to me in more detail please. So you print the adhesive first onto the paper followed by the actual image. So the last layer printed will not be the adhesive? And you don`t mirror image the artwork when printing? So how do you get the image of the transfer paper not looking mirror imaged on the garment? And of course your adhesive will be the top layer on your garment. Or do you peel the transfer of the paper by hand before pressing it onto the garment? I just can`t get my head around it.
 

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yes no right or wrong here. Whatever works best for you I guess. We use only thin thread mesh here. Our lowest mesh count is a 150-S which we use for the base. We have 225-S which we can use easily for high detail images that require metallic inks. Our highest mesh would be a 330-S.
 

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Using transfer tape like you do for vinyl.
Sorry the last time we we did tons of transfers was back in London in the early 2000s, these days maybe one or two jobs a year. I`m keen to know what the advantage would be going the extra step of not mirroring your transfers and instead using transfer tape. Is actually anyone doing that?
 

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I`m keen to know what the advantage would be going the extra step of not mirroring your transfers and instead using transfer tape. Is actually anyone doing that?
I used to do it years ago, so i could easily do re-prints months later.
Easy extra money for very little work.
 
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