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Hope it works out for you, I don't know enough about process to really help out, but I have been told that when you are doing fine detailed process each channel gets a different angle. I also tried searching on google for some photoshop tutorials on comic book halftone effects. There were a couple that might be of use, but nothing exactly what you are looking for. Good luck!
 

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Actually, I've heard the opposite. I participated in a class at the Long Beach ISS Show, and was shown 2 samples of process prints on darks. One had all the same angle, the other had different angles. There was no difference in the samples.

Traditionally, when I print halftones, I try to make it for a 156 mesh. So the SMALLEST dot I use is a 35lpi, MAYBE 45, but that would be pushing it. I always use a 61 degree angle, as this is one of the most optimum angles to set dots along the right angles of the mesh without them falling through. Think about it...when you look at a screen, what angle are the lines?
Sounds great. I won't disagree with you because I really don't know anything about process printing, just hearsay. I was under the impression that you used different angles though so you don't get Moire.

U.S. Screen Print & Inkjet Technology | QUICK GLOSSARY

Angle
The angle of the dot is the angle at which the dots chain together. The problem with most computer graphics programs is that the angles of the halftones are generally great for offset printing but not good for screening. A lot of computer programs use 45 degrees as the default angle. Actually, 20 to 25 degrees is good for basic halftone work. If you are doing a process color job you can try Cyan 15, Magenta 45, Yellow and Black 75, or Cyan 22.5, Magenta 52.5, Yellow and Black 82.5.
 
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