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I mean, unless you really want to dive in and have tons of money, time and energy to invest in learning a new craft, it is definitely cheaper to contract the printing. You need more than just the press - conveyor dryer, flash unit, ink, exposure unit, washout system, way to prepare separations.. That said, if you are serious about this, I would recommend the Riley Hopkins 4 color 1 station press as a way to dip your toes in the water without risking too much. If you want a nice press that won't let you down, check out Vastex. I have been using a Vastex 8 color 8 station manual to run my shop the last 4.5 years and have zero complaints. Will cost a lot, but that's the price you pay for consistency, reliability, and quality. A press like the Riley Hopkins won't have any micro adjustments, and is very bare bones to say the least - most printers could consider it a toy press - but you have to start somewhere
 

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Couldn't have said it better than Raw Paw did.
It is without a doubt easier and cheaper in the long run to hire out your printing if you are only wanting to do a clothing brand. It doesn't make sense to purchase all of the equipment & supplies, dedicate all the time to learning the process, and then only print a few shirts.
If you REALLY want to start yourself, I agree with the 4 color single station Riley Hopkins press from Ryonet, very entry level, but will get the job done. Another option is the Hobby or Shocker press from Anthem. Both companies also offer entire packages, I believe.
 

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Get a relatively inexpensive press to start but make sure it has good clamps to securely hold the screen. If you put out the word that you're set up to print T-shirts, the press will quickly pay for itself with local one and two color work and then you'll have it for your clothing line.

A big benefit to printing your own is that you can print orders as they come in. If you contract out you'll need to order a substantial quantity and will need some of each size. If you run out of one size and somebody orders another you'll need to pay for another run just to fill that one order.

An alternative to a screen press is to buy a heat press instead and order plastisol transfers of your designs. That way you'll have them on hand and can press each shirt as the orders come in.
 

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I mean, unless you really want to dive in and have tons of money, time and energy to invest in learning a new craft, it is definitely cheaper to contract the printing. You need more than just the press - conveyor dryer, flash unit, ink, exposure unit, washout system, way to prepare separations.. That said, if you are serious about this, I would recommend the Riley Hopkins 4 color 1 station press as a way to dip your toes in the water without risking too much. If you want a nice press that won't let you down, check out Vastex. I have been using a Vastex 8 color 8 station manual to run my shop the last 4.5 years and have zero complaints. Will cost a lot, but that's the price you pay for consistency, reliability, and quality. A press like the Riley Hopkins won't have any micro adjustments, and is very bare bones to say the least - most printers could consider it a toy press - but you have to start somewhere

I am also interested to start screen printing one color one station for start and I have read that you can dry the ink with heatpress or a heatgun!Is it possible?
Also if I buy one color station with microadjustments will I be able to print two colors in one tshirt?
Last question do I need an exposure unit or one exposure light is enough to get the job done?
Thanks in advanced
 

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I am also interested to start screen printing one color one station for start and I have read that you can dry the ink with heatpress or a heatgun!Is it possible?
Also if I buy one color station with microadjustments will I be able to print two colors in one tshirt?
Last question do I need an exposure unit or one exposure light is enough to get the job done?
Thanks in advanced

Heat press is more accurate than a heat gun, but both will do the job.


You wont be able to print two colours on a one colour press.


A halogen work light is good enough for exposing the screen. Make sure it has a 3200k bulb, not a 2700/2800k one.
 
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