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I have seen it mentioned that some people have their logo on the back along the neckline. Anyone know where I can see this?

I am considering using the back neckline or sleeve. I am just going to have my site address there. If on the sleeve, should it be centered on the outside or towards the front? If it was on the outside you would have the seam from underneath creating an uneven surface when applying the transfer.
 

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I think it all depends on how bad you want people to see your brand name. The likes of French Connection or another established company can afford to put theirs on the neck where it won't be noticed as much as they are a recognised well established brand where as people like us need to get our brands out there and SEEN, which is why i have mine on the sleeve.

w
 

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SpacemanFL said:
I have seen it mentioned that some people have their logo on the back along the neckline. Anyone know where I can see this?
Here's an example of a neckline location:



I am considering using the back neckline or sleeve. I am just going to have my site address there.
I would suggest adding a little something more than just your site address. You should "stylize" it so it isn't just a domain name slapped on the shirt, but more of a "brand" or an extension of the design.


If on the sleeve, should it be centered on the outside or towards the front? If it was on the outside you would have the seam from underneath creating an uneven surface when applying the transfer.
Usually, sleeve prints are done centered on the outside, not facing the front (which would seem a bit too in your face).
 

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I should also probably point out that putting logos on your tees can harm your sales.

Personally I judge on a case by case basis - if I like the logo and it's tasteful I'll buy it, if I don't like it it's a lost sale. This makes life twice as hard for designers really - for example, I may hate your company name, but I like your shirt. No logo? No problem - call yourself whatever you want. Logo on the shirt? Oh-oh.

An url is a definite no-no. I've never bought a shirt with an url on it. The time may well come, but it will be an uphill battle. If your name is memorable people will find you.

The bad news is as far as I can tell my stance is a fairly liberal one - a lot of people are militantly opposed to logos on tees. It's half the reason they buy online from independents and not at large stores - they don't want to be walking billboards. Small designers often think this attitude only applies to Nike - it doesn't.

If you do it make sure you clearly show the logo so people know what they're buying up front. Some people go so far as to return the shirt otherwise (and I think they have every right to).

That said, you're trying to make your brand more visible and that may gain you some sales. It's a trade off. Will you gain sales? Maybe. Will you lose sales? Certainly. Which way works out better? Who knows.
 

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I think it all depends on wether you are trying to create brand awareness or simply sell t shirts to make money, hopefully both but as Solmu said, it's tough. I personally want my brand out there rather than just sell vast quantity of shirts with designs on, sure i'll be cutting out some people who don't want that, but i'm in this to create a brand and a lifestyle attributed to that brand, and my foremost desire is just that and that will always come before making money.
 

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I agree with Wozza1, it really depends on what you're trying to do. If you're looking for a more marketing approach and don't mind eating some of the money it's costing you for the shirts, throw the URL and whatever logo you want, because it WILL help with brand recognition and recall...but again, as others have said, it might not sell well. Why not just ship with hang tags that have your logo on them? People have to cut them off, and when they do, they of course see the logo. Thats a less invasive appraoch to logo exposure...just throwing ideas out there.
 

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Jeans have brand logos on them, tennis shoes have brand logos on them, cars have brand logos on them.

I never understood the reasoning why people would be offended if a t-shirt had a brand logo on it in an unobtrusive manner.

I would say from experience that a VERY small percentage of shoppers will object to a small, well designed brand logo on the back of a t-shirt.

One of my customers mentioned that they saw my shirt while they were on vacation in Spain, they got the web address from the guy wearing the shirt and when they went back home to Canada 2 weeks later, they remembered the URL.

Another customer just recently said that she was talking on the phone to her mom in another state and her mom saw a person wearing on of my shirts, told her daughter about it and her daughter cracked up laughing and made the mom track down the guy and see where he got it.

In my biased opinion, I would say the benefits far outweigh the risks, especially if you're in it for the long term, and building a brand is part of your goal.

If you just want to sell some cool shirts you designed, and aren't worried about branding at all, then it may not be as big of a deal, and I wouldn't put the URL on it.

I have some shirts that I don't put any logo or brand on because they are just funny things that I thought of that I wanted to see if they would sell, and they weren't associated with any "brand".
 

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There is an extremely high end very popular brand that has their logo all over their tees Juicy Couture. Theirs fetch a price of 79-200 depending on the garment. I definitely don't think if you are appealling to high end market that branding is an issue. All those little embellishment seem to make them sell faster.

Mine are up with that brand and I hope to be as successful and I plan on branding in unique ways. i agree with rodney it will not matter to most of the population...

btw I own three juicy shirts, 4 hoodies, and several jackets

Amanda
 

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After a bit of a brainstorming session, it was clear that getting my website's URL out there was important at this point (3 weeks since launch) and the logo/url (one and the same for my biz) is going on all my t-shirts from now on on the rear-neckline just like the pic above.

However, with the rate of sales I've had, it'll take a LOONNNNGGG time to get any kind of decent exposure. I've already given t-shirts away to friends and family for free which is great exposure, but that's at a loss to my biz. How about cutting my margins so that I make less profit but probably sell more and therefore get more exposure for my website/url?

I don't know whether it'll work but it's worth a try and as my business is now paying it's own way rather than eating money, I can afford to try something like this. I'll report back how it affects sales.
 

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How about cutting my margins so that I make less profit but probably sell more and therefore get more exposure for my website/url?
I think that makes a big assumption that price is what's causing people not to buy from your shop. Lowering your price might give customers the impression that your t-shirts are "cheap" (quality).

If your pricepoint is decent, I don't think you need to mess with it much. You just have to market and advertise better.
 

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I'm going to give it a go with the reduced prices this weekend (as my stuff only seems to sell at weekends) and see how it goes.

I look at it that what is a £9.50 t-shirt suddenly costs £11.25 when p&p is added. I know I've been put off buying things in the past (on ebay,where my sales are coming from) once I realised the total cost with postage.

I also think there's a £10 barrier where people are willing to pay up to that for a t-shirt but once it goes over that then they're put off.

This is really just an experiment that I can afford to try it at this stage and it's purely to get the logo on t-shirts out on the streets without making a loss. If I don't sell any more than normal this weekend, the price goes back up again.
 

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personally, i hate logos and brand names. i avoid any clothing that says where it is from. i am not alone in this either.. so be careful before you turn your clothing into a billboard.
 

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Rodney - where would you put the logo if you had a back print? On the sleeve?
I would (and do) put it right below the back neckline very small. My printer calls it a "back tab" location. Not just a URL, but a stylized logo that goes with the shirt.

personally, i hate logos and brand names. i avoid any clothing that says where it is from. i am not alone in this either.. so be careful before you turn your clothing into a billboard.
This is true. Not all markets will "accept" a brand logo on the shirt. However, there are some that do, as we see logo merchandise selling in stores every day. So you just have to make sure your market isn't one of those ones that are "anti-logo"
 

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I think it depends on alot of things. One think I would not like is a website printed on the outside of the shirt. As for your brand name I say why not. If you have a logo or a brand name that makes your clothes yours than put it on your shirt. There obviously is a market for many many many many brands that have names on them. Just walk into stores and look around. If adding your brand to your shirts fits your theme/designs that its a good idea because brand awareness is important to for word of mouth and for people who see your clothes they might want to know where/who you got it from. That being said it’s all about placement. You might not want to slap your logo on the back of the shirt if it detracts from your overall design but if it fits than do it. Also get some drop tags -i am using business cards that have a nice design and even explain my brand name and (will once its finished) website url on the back. It’s a cheap way of adding both a more professional look with drop tags and its non-invasive.
 

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I think it all depends on how bad you want people to see your brand name. The likes of French Connection or another established company can afford to put theirs on the neck where it won't be noticed as much as they are a recognised well established brand where as people like us need to get our brands out there and SEEN, which is why i have mine on the sleeve.

w
I agree, what about someone with long hair that covers it. At least with someone with short hair you would have a chance of displaying it better, but I just don't think it's a good place for logo.
 

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my first run of gear back in 2007, i had my logo on the back right shoulder....it was visible and my log is real simple so i could probably place it anywhere without an issue.... the 2009, i'm putting the logo under the neck line and centered...and i think i will leave it there until i can find a good reason to move it.

i used to wear puma all the time because i liked their styling. i had shirts that said puma on them and they were done right. i can understand if your just trying to slap a 'name' on a shirt and have no 'backing/story' behind it, then it might not go well.

b
 
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