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Usually how long it will evaporates completely? 10 secs? is it ok if i do it more than 10 secs for the first press on the pretreated shirt?
 

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I can't tell you the exact time I heat press. It varies so much, with the design I'm printing, to the shirt color, type, thread count. Depends on a lot of things. The best way to figure it out is to just read these forums, get an idea of what you need to do, and go try it and experiment using different settings and pre-treatment levels. You will find the best way!
 

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so to minimize fibrillation, we can lay more ink when printing. how about removing these little fibers first before printing? is there any way to do that? I think if we just lay these little fibers down with heat pressing or using pretreatment, we can't minimize fibrillation.
 

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so to minimize fibrillation, we can lay more ink when printing. how about removing these little fibers first before printing? is there any way to do that? I think if we just lay these little fibers down with heat pressing or using pretreatment, we can't minimize fibrillation.
There is no way that I know of to remove the fibers. They are the shirt. The shirt is made up of short pieces of cotton fiber and the ends of those short pieces are what is popping up.
Laying them down by heat pressing may help a little but that isn't the answer either.
Dumping a bunch of ink on the shirt isn't what you want to do either. That is probably why dark shirts using white ink have less of a problem but you don't want the added expense and time of pouring a heavy layer of ink on shirts that don't need it.
Pretreatment may or may not do much for fibrilation.

The best thing that I have found to fight fibrilation is to use extremely light pressure when curing. And I mean extremely light pressure. Go as light as your heat press can go and still stay closed. You don't need pressure to cure these inks. Some shops cure in a conveyor dryer.

Try this, print two exact shirts. Cure one at medium pressure and cure the other at almost no pressure. Use the same print settings, time and temp. Make sure that you mark the shirts with a permanent marker so you will know which is which later. Wash them and see the results. Then come back and report in this thread.

For time and temp your best bet is to go with the manufacturers specs. If you have issues with those times and temps then make adjustments from there. If you don't know what the recommended numbers are ask the person you buy ink from. And I will go out on a limb here and say that if you do have issues using the recommended temp then you may have an inaccurate temp guage on your press. Even new presses can be off and a few degrees can make a huge difference.

Brian
 

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what is quilon sheet? I use a tefolon sheet for pre-treatment and parchment paper for curing. Is this wrong?
Some parchment papers have a quilon coating. I don't use quilon parchment, I use regular parchment paper. I used to use a teflon sheet but it leaves the fabric shiny. It will wash out but I just don't like shipping a shirt looking like that.

Here is a bit of info on quilon coating. I got it off of a web site of a company that doesn't sell quilon parchment so take it or leave it because it is negative on quilon. But it should help you to understand what people are talking about.

"Many parchment papers are coated with quilon. Quilon is a chemical containing chrome – a heavy metal – which when incinerated becomes toxic and leaves trace elements. The reason for the majority of parchment paper to be quilon-coated is the cost, which is substantially lower than silicone. So, in order to be environmentally friendly, the paper should be silicone-coated."

Hope this helps some.

Brian
 

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by the way, does a DTG printed shirt should need a special treatment when washing it? inside out washing? no brush and no rub? what are the recomended washing technique? I heard that wrong way to wash can affect fibrillation. is that right?
 

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do You pretreat until you see snow? I think that is too much pretreatment?

I have done this numerous times and get good results. It may be too much Pre Treatment but it works. I would rather over pre treat than under pre treat. When you under pre treat, you can waste ink, shirts, pre treatment & time, because of the white not being as bold as you wanted. Too much pre treatment waste pre treatment. That's not so bad, but it can affect your washability in some cases. Also, after you spray on the pre treatment and wipe it away (left to right) the snow goes away. :)
 

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You also have to remember that too much pretreatment can be just as bad as not enough in your wash results. If there is too much your ink can peel and flake off. Just something to keep in mind :)
 
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In support of Sunnydayz' comment - I just had a comment from a customer that the left chest on a black shirt was peeling and the full back was still fine. I know I put more pretreatment on the front than the back when I did this job since it is harder to just spray a little in a small area. If you are seeing "snow" it is probably too much.
 

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Here is a link to the brush I use Wooster White Fancy, its actually called china bristle but its the same as a boar bristle brush pretty much. The way I brush the fibers is straight down, and no other direction. I have tried the foam brushes and rollers before and they fibers seem to stick to them more therefore pulling the fibers up, so that they are not laying flat.

With the brush it makes the fibers lay down nice and flat, by brushing them straight down. I have found this to work the best for me, along with the light mist of distilled water first before spraying pretreatment, and then using the quilan paper on top to dry the pretreat for 10 seconds, removing paper and then pressing another 10 seconds without anything on top of the shirt. Hope this helps :)

Hey there, I am a serious newby. I have a question about the Quilan paper. Can I use parchment paper when doing the pretreatment? How many times can I use a sheet? Can I use the same paper for pressing that I used for pretreatment? Sorry to overwhelm with questions. Thank you for your help.
 

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Hey there, I am a serious newby. I have a question about the Quilan paper. Can I use parchment paper when doing the pretreatment? How many times can I use a sheet? Can I use the same paper for pressing that I used for pretreatment? Sorry to overwhelm with questions. Thank you for your help.
I reuse parchment paper a few times. After a few pressings my parchment starts getting ripples in it that transfer to the shirt when pressing.

I use a different piece of parchment for pretreat than I do for curing. I don't know if it is necessary or not.

Brian
 

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For the pretreatment, you need the uncoated parchment which is called Quillan, and for curing your ink you need the silicone coated parchement.

Here is the place where I get the quillan 019010 / QG251624 Mcnairn 16.38x24.38 25# Quillon Sheets 1000, and here is a place you can get the silicone treated Exopap Silicone Double Face Baking Paper. Both of these are large sheets that fit 16 x 20 heat presses and the silicone sheets are double side coated, so you can use either side.

I have seen some silicone sheets that come coated on only one side, so be careful of this.

Both of the places I have listed though are really great prices and will last a while :D
 

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You want to use the Quillan because it is uncoated. The silicone treated paper can cause a film of silicone to adhere to the shirt if used with pretreatment, and could cause ink binding problems. So it is important to use the proper paper, for the proper process. The Quillan is much cheaper then the silicone treated paper. Its about half the price when buying the large bulk amounts. The Quillan comes in boxes of 1000, while the silicone coated comes in boxes of 500. You only want to use the silicone treated with curing the ink :)
 

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Could you please post a pic of something you have done using these 2 papers. I would like to see the diffrence between what you have printed and what I have printed. Something on a black or dark background would be great. Using these papers do you get better white coverage?

Thanks
April
 
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