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Hello. I'm hoping someone could be of assistance. I bought this dryer used from someone and after turning it on and having it running for more than an hour the wires connecting to the heating element are melting and causing the dryer to stop heating. Any advice on how to fix this?
 

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Most likely A DIY job using the wrong type of cable and crimp connectors.
I cannot see if these were connected directly to the heating element or a braided extension.
In the case of the former, add around 10 inches of braided high temperature wire, and use heavy duty stainless crimp connectors.
Alternatively you can use ceramic terminal blocks.
Ideally, the ceramic blocks should be bolted to the frame for cooling.
 

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that is not a stock wire coming in (added later)

you say 'wires' burnt, but it looks like only one fried, the ground wire
is ther others burnt (like the neutral white?)

first thing i would do is get rid of that cord coming in and replace it with a decent 12/2 extension (10'-25' should be plenty, or buy some 12/2 off a roll cut to your desired length)
if you buy an extension cord, keep the male end stock and cut off the female end (then use the appropriate butt connectors, or marrettes, and electrical-tape them off)
a good mechanical connection, is a good electrical connection

short term, cut the existing male plug off the existing cord and add a new one (brass screw = hot/black wire normally)
for testing simply expose some ground wire and tape it to exposed metal (like the area in your pic)
if it fries that ground wire again, your outlet is not wired properly, re-tape some fresh ground wire and try a new outlet
people use to bond the neutral to the ground in outlets of older homes to pass inspection (not good)

could be your unit, but start by turning off the breaker to that outlet and checking the wiring within
 

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if you buy an extension cord, keep the male end stock and cut off the female end (then use the appropriate butt connectors, or marrettes, and electrical-tape them off)
Electrical tape has no place near heating elements.

Looking at it again... Looks like the wires are crimped to a braided extension, which is good.
Finger Wood Wrist Thumb Nail

Make sure the power cable is high temperature rated, and use stainless steel crimps with a proper crimping tool.
You don't want to deform/flatten the crimps, you want to shrink them.
 

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Electrical tape has no place near heating elements.

Looking at it again... Looks like the wires are crimped to a braided extension, which is good.
View attachment 276721
Make sure the power cable is high temperature rated, and use stainless steel crimps with a proper crimping tool.
You don't want to deform/flatten the crimps, you want to shrink them.
pretty sure there is electrical tape both left and right of the ground connector you are pointing to
the connections are not near the heat elements, they come in at the top and then to the temp controller and onto the heating units
just like a heat press that has a standard cord coming in to the controller and then soldered onto the heat platen itself, no need for special cord (unless you are splicing onto the heating element itself)

this looks like a 120V cord, maybe someone rigged up the 220V to run on 120V, then that could also be trouble electrically (ok for short on-times, not good for continuous use)
 

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pretty sure there is electrical tape both left and right of the ground connector you are pointing to
These are... but that's not what I meant by "near".
What I meant is that electrical tape sould not be used in the section of the cable that's getting hot.

maybe someone rigged up the 220V to run on 120V, then that could also be trouble electrically
This is not possible because 120v is way too low for a 220v heating element.

Anyway, the main issue here appears to be the crappy wire crimping job.
The steel wire coming from the heating element will expand when hot, and this will loosen the connection to the cooper wires.
This will cause arcing and make them overheat until they burn. A common cause of electrical fires.

Using the correct crimp connectors will fix the issue.
This is the correct type and should ideally be stainless steel.
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