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Laying ink on the shirt not in the shirt

1455 Views 9 Replies 6 Participants Last post by  MBrhythm
Thank you for taking your time to read and answer my question.

Q: Best way to get the ink to lay on the surface of the shirt rather than into the shirt?

I have been printing for a little over a year. Never had any training or worked with someone. Just bought my press, read A LOT on this forum and watched what I could on youtube. I'm using a manual press (HIX) with union ink. Most shirts are one, two or three color jobs. (spot) I'm using 100 to 220 mesh screens. Two part emulsion. screen are coated on both side and dried print side down. My off contact is about 1/4 inch( 4mm ) off the shirt.
The problem I'm having is, I cant get the ink just to lay on top of the shirt. I need to put down two or three passes before the ink looks solid. But it gives a real heavy hand which I want to avoid.

I hope this is enough info for you to help. I will try to take some pictures of the next problem shirts and post them here.

Thank you
MB
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Too much off contact. Should be no more than 1/8". At 1/4" your screen is probably barely touching the shirt and you're using way too much pressure. Reducing the off contact will reduce the amount of pressure you use and give you more even ink coverage. Also, are you printing lights or darks?
Also, are you printing lights or darks?
It's been about 50/50. On the darker shirts I run into the problem of shirt fibers showing through the ink. Most of the time I try not to use an under base. But I know their are many thing to do to reduce the amount of fibers coming through like, clear under base, spray/ mist with water before printing.

About the off contact; I've lowered it before but the ink wasn't staying on the shirt. Some was coming up with the screen. :confused:
Are your screens tensioned properly? Did you happen to buy them used? You might also try reducing your ink a bit, especially on light colors.
Are your screens tensioned properly? Did you happen to buy them used? You might also try reducing your ink a bit, especially on light colors.
They were bought used but I had them re-screened by a company.
When you say "light colors", do you mean the ink or the shirts? I often used reducer with the ink on white or light shirts. Never for black shirts...
Hey, we print alot of white on dark... imho union ink is much to thick so we quit after it didint work we now use wilflex,rutland,and another the name escapes me now....our off contact with the shirt on the pallet is less than 1/2 paint stick, we only use 156 for white, pfp with flash till fully set,warm pallets with flash ,think that is most of the details...oh yea print several strike offs to get ink moving....probably do at least 3 white ink jobs /day...auto press so you can only stroke flash stroke done.....jeff
"Fibrillation" occurs when yarn fibers come through the ink film after washing. Certain types of yarns are more prone to fibrillation than others. How do you control it? Make sure you properly cure the inks and consider using a slightly coarser mesh count. More ink will be deposited which will help minimize the effect.
https://www.storesonline.com/site/799934/page/853186 read this for printing with white or any color for that matter.

Hey, we print alot of white on dark... imho union ink is much to thick so we quit after it didint work we now use wilflex,rutland,and another the name escapes me now....our off contact with the shirt on the pallet is less than 1/2 paint stick, we only use 156 for white, pfp with flash till fully set,warm pallets with flash ,think that is most of the details...oh yea print several strike offs to get ink moving....probably do at least 3 white ink jobs /day...auto press so you can only stroke flash stroke done.....jeff
You intentionally heat up your pallets? Do you ever run into problems of the ink gelling in the screen?
You intentionally heat up your pallets? Do you ever run into problems of the ink gelling in the screen?
Many printers heat their boards before printing. With some inks (Matsui's HO Series for example) the ink prints better and has better coverage when the boards are warm.

Gelling is not usually a problem, but it can happen. Every ink is a little different.
Hey, we print alot of white on dark... imho union ink is much to thick so we quit after it didint work we now use wilflex,rutland,and another the name escapes me now....our off contact with the shirt on the pallet is less than 1/2 paint stick, we only use 156 for white, pfp with flash till fully set,warm pallets with flash ,think that is most of the details...oh yea print several strike offs to get ink moving....probably do at least 3 white ink jobs /day...auto press so you can only stroke flash stroke done.....jeff
Thanks Jeff,
I'm using a manual press. I have never read about preheating the pallets before. I'll keep that in mind.
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