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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi there! I've been trying to wrap my mind about this but can't find something that convinces me.

First thing first, I'm not a native english speaker so there's probably something passing over my head and that might be key to understand what I need.

I've read a lot about humidifiers (mainly on this forum), and as far as I read, we shouldn't use a "cool mist" or "ultrasonic" humidifier. We are supposed to want a "evaporative" humidifier.

First: why's that? Is it about lime? Where? Can't clean the lime deposits? I've seen this post that seems to be some Anajet staff saying that they use a cool mist humidifier.

Second: What's exactly a "evaporative" humidifier? vaporizing as "boiling watter until it's steam"? Doesn't sound like a good idea to have a machine steaming us or the printer and work in a permanently heating enviroment, specially now in summer. Is it some other kind of humidifier that doesn't heat the water?

Third: Where should I put it? Right by the front of the printer, so the humidity enters directly? On top of it? At the back? (We've got a Brother 361 and a Brother GTX, but it's only the GTX who is giving us problems with humidity)

The thing is, I have problems finding the humidifiers people recommend here since every link seems to be outdated and won't work, or it's a discontinued product at best. Also I'm in Europe, so links to USA shops will just be some kind of guiding light to understand what I'm looking for.

Can someone show me pics of the correct kind of humidifier? Links? Specific models? PLEASE tell me what's the problem with the cool mist ones?

Thanks a lot, and sorry if I'm asking some previously answered questions. I'll be looking forward to your answers :)
 

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This is paranoia...
Adding humidity is easy, but removing it is harder. Anyway, here is what you need to do.



1. Control the temperature. You should keep it steady around 80F (27C). Any AC will do.

2. Once you have the temperature fixed, get a hygrometer, and see what the actually humidity level is.

3. If too dry (very unlikely), all you need to do is mop the floor with pure water and wait. You get the idea? Let nature take its course

4. If humidity is too high, buy a dehumidifier.
 

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I use plastic bottles 1.5 liter ones and cut them on top and I just fill them with water. But I don't use them for t-shirt industry. I use them at winter when air is to dry cause of heat radiators. I can see in 2 days the bottles are almost empty.
 

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I use plastic bottles 1.5 liter ones and cut them on top and I just fill them with water. But I don't use them for t-shirt industry. I use them at winter when air is to dry cause of heat radiators. I can see in 2 days the bottles are almost empty.
Put the bottles on the radiator, and it will work faster.
Overdo it, and it will be like in a sauna ;)
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thank you both for the quick answers! It's great to finally find some active community about DTG.

You see, the temperature is just right. The room hygrometer marks around 40-45%, BUT the GTX got it's own hygrometer which is around 35%... when it gets to 34% a warning appears on screen, and at 30% the printer starts to make white ink washes after EVERY SINGLE print, which is a huge and unacceptable waste.

We've never had this problem with the GT-361. Even if the GTX is being too picky with humidity, we need to comply since if we don't it starts wasting the all-expensive white ink.

Do you think wetting the floor under the printer or putting some water recipients will do?

Also, what if the printer gets too humid? Do rust appear? I guess it can be bad to the greased parts?
 

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Well, looks like you need more humidity... 40% is too low, and obviously one of the two hygrometers is inaccurate.



Anyway, you didn't get my point. Water will evaporate naturally in unsaturated air, raising the humidity. Moping the floor exposes a large surface of water to air, which would accelerate the process. Mist is another way to do the same.



You can add plants and see it it helps , or you can buy this

https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Daewoo-P...n-Heater-Air-Purifier-Humidifier/152670055967


Don't put it near the printer, as you don't really want condensation. You need to raise the room humidity to around 55%.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Well, looks like you need more humidity... 40% is too low, and obviously one of the two hygrometers is inaccurate.



Anyway, you didn't get my point. Water will evaporate naturally in unsaturated air, raising the humidity. Moping the floor exposes a large surface of water to air, which would accelerate the process. Mist is another way to do the same.



You can add plants and see it it helps , or you can buy this

https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Daewoo-P...n-Heater-Air-Purifier-Humidifier/152670055967


Don't put it near the printer, as you don't really want condensation. You need to raise the room humidity to around 55%.
Thanks a lot! It's not that I missed the point, what I should have ask is "will wetting the floor do ENOUGH?".

I don't know if the hygrometer inside the GTX is inaccurate. Maybe the humidity inside the printer is not the same as outside. Also I'm afraid the air conditioner is pointing kind of too directly to the printer, so that might be drying it.

I think we'll try moving the hygrometer closer to the printer, abundantly moping the floor and maybe putting some plants to see what happens. Will report back with results.

Thanks a lot!! <3
 

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Thanks a lot! It's not that I missed the point, what I should have ask is "will wetting the floor do ENOUGH?".

I don't know if the hygrometer inside the GTX is inaccurate. Maybe the humidity inside the printer is not the same as outside. Also I'm afraid the air conditioner is pointing kind of too directly to the printer, so that might be drying it.

I think we'll try moving the hygrometer closer to the printer, abundantly moping the floor and maybe putting some plants to see what happens. Will report back with results.

Thanks a lot!! <3
Moping the floor will definitely work. but you may have to keep doing it. As humidity rises, you will notice, eventually the floor will start drying slower, and so will the ink on the printhead.

The AC does dry the air, and this is why it is dripping water. With the increased humidity, you will notice it will start producing more water... and the cycle continues. :cool:
 

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You could always try a few of these hanging on the radiator ...



eBay


We had an apartment in the French Alps for skiing. It was at nearly 2000m and South-facing, so constantly bombarded with sunlight through the day. Humidity levels were low and they had similar humidifiers to these hanging on the radiator which were very effective.
 
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